splendid dwarf spider

(Hypselistes florens)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

splendid dwarf spider

 

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Very common

Season

April through August

Habitat/Host

 

Size

Female Body Length: 1 16 to (2.5 to 3 mm)

Male Body Length: 1 16 (2.3 to 2.5 mm)

Legspan: 3 16 to ¼ (5 to 6 mm)

         
          Photo by Alfredo Colon

Identification

Splendid dwarf spider is a very small, very common, eight-eyed spider. It occurs across northern United States and Canada.

The male and female are similar in shape and color. The female is 1 16 to (2.5 to 3 mm) long, the male a little smaller, 1 16 (2.3 to 2.5 mm) long.

The front part of the body (cephalothorax) is bright orange, about as wide as long, rounded on the sides, and slightly constricted at the base. On the female it is relatively flat when viewed from the side. On the male there is a very high lobe near the front that bears the front middle eyes (anterior median eyes, or AME). The lobe is somewhat lighter in color than the rest of the cephalothorax. The remaining six eyes are arranged in a lower, slightly curved row of three closely-spaced pairs of eyes. On the male, there is a pit (cephalic pit) in a groove just behind each pair of posterior lateral eyes.

The abdomen is dark gray to nearly black, spherical, and shiny.

The legs are medium-length and are armed with spines. The first three segments of each leg (coxa, trochanter, and femur) are bright orange, the remaining segments gray.

 
Similar
Species

 


Food

 

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

Spiderlings disperse in the fall by “ballooning”. They climb a branch, blade of grass, or fencepost, and release a long thread of silk. The silk thread catches the wind or even a light breeze and the spiderling floats to a new site.


Distribution Distribution Map   Sources: 24, 29, 30.

Comments

Rarely Seen
Though very common, splendid dwarf spider is rarely seen. It spends its time under dead leaves, rocks, or other debris. It is often collected in large numbers in sweep nets.


Taxonomy

Order:

Araneae (spiders)

 

Suborder:

Araneomorphae (true spiders)

 

No Rank:

Entelegynae (eight-eyed spiders)

 

No Rank:

Orbicularia

 

Superfamily:

Araneoidea

 

Family:

Linyphiidae (sheetweb and dwarf spiders)

 

Subfamily:

Erigoninae (dwarf spiders)

 
Subordinate Taxa

splendid dwarf spider (Hypselistes florens bulbiceps)

splendid dwarf spider (Hypselistes florens florens)

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

peatland sheet-web weaver
splendid dwarf spider


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Cephalothorax

The front part of a spider’s body, composed of the head region and the thoracic area fused together. Eyes, legs, and antennae are attached to this part.

 

 

       

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Alfredo Colon


  splendid dwarf spider   splendid dwarf spider

       
       

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  Splendid Dwarf Spider (Linyphiidae: Hypselistes florens) Belaying
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Published on Oct 15, 2011

Photographed at Grand Forks, North Dakota (14 October 2011).

 
     

 

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Alfredo Colon
8/12/2018

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

splendid dwarf spider


     
     
 

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