camel cricket

(Ceuthophilus sp.)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

camel cricket (Ceuthophilus sp.)

NatureServe

not listed

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common

Flight/Season

Most commonly found August to October

Habitat

Under rotten logs, stones, mole hills, basements, and other dark, moist places.

Size

½ to 1

          Photo by Bill Reynolds

Identification

This is a large or medium-sized cricket. Adult males are ½ to 1 long. Females are larger than males.

The body is stout and has a distinctive hump-backed shape. It may be whitish, pale brown, or almost black, with contrasting mottled markings. The egg-laying structure (ovipositor) on females is blade-like and straight.

The legs are long and slender. The fourth segment of the leg (tibia) is longer than the third segment (femur). The tibia of each back leg is thick and has more than four pairs of movable spines. There is no spine on the front or side (dorso-lateral) surface of the tibia of the front leg. All legs have four end segments (tarsi). The first tarsus is almost as long as the remaining tarsi together.

The head is oval shaped and is bent downward between the forelegs. The antennae are tapered and longer than the body, usually 2 or more times as long as the body.

There are no wings or hearing organs (tympani).

 
Similar
Genera

Asian camel cricket (Diestrammena sp.) bodies are banded, not mottled. There is a pair of downward pointing, horn-like projections between the antennae. The tibia is more slender . The spurs on the hind tibia, except for those at the end, are short and inconspicuous. There is a long, conspicuous spine on the front of the femur of the front leg.


Larval Food

 

 
Adult Food

Decaying organic matter, including mushrooms, dead insects, fruits, flowers, and dung.

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

Adults are active at night.


Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 7, 24, 27, 29.


Comments

 


Taxonomy

Order:

Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets, katydids)

 

Suborder:

Ensifera (crickets and katydids)

 

Superfamily:

Rhaphidophoroidea

 

Family:

Rhaphidophoridae (camel crickets)

 

Subfamily:

Ceuthophilinae

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

camel cricket

cave cricket


 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

femur

On insects and arachnids, the third, largest, most robust segment of the leg, coming immediately before the tibia. On humans, the thigh bone.

 

ovipositor

A long needle-like tube on the abdomens of some female insects, used to inject eggs into soil or plant stems.

 

tarsus

The last two to five sections of an insect’s leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. Plural: tarsi.

 

tibia

The fourth segment of an insect leg, after the femur and before the tarsus (foot).

 

tympanum

An external hearing structure. In reptiles and amphibians, the circular, disk-like membrane that covers the ear opening. In insects, the membrane covering the air sac and sensory neurons. Plural: tympani.

 

 

 

 

       

Visitor Photos

   
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Jason And Amanda Alexander


  camel cricket (Ceuthophilus sp.)    

Bill Reynolds


While trapping pocket gophers in my garden, this little fella hopped out.

  camel cricket (Ceuthophilus sp.)   camel cricket (Ceuthophilus sp.)
       
  camel cricket (Ceuthophilus sp.)    

       
       
       

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  camel cricket (Ceuthophilus sp.)    
       
       

 

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Slideshows

   
  camel cricket (possibly Ceuthophilus latens)
Bill Keim
 
  camel cricket (possibly Ceuthophilus latens)  

 

slideshow

     

Visitor Videos

   
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Other Videos

 
  Cave Cricket (Camel cricket) Ceuthophilus sp.
The Wimberley Naturalist
 
   
 
About

Published on Jul 13, 2014

This is a male Cave Cricket (or Camel Cricket) we found in the bathroom today. Cave crickets lack wings, and have a distinctive hump and downward-facing face, very long antennae and long legs, which enable them to jump quite high and far. The males of this species cannot chirp like other species can. Like their name implies, they can often be found in caves (and have a hump), and like most crickets are nocturnal (which is why this guy keeps out of the sunlight in the video). They also prefer dark, damp, cool environments (like caves!), which is why it was in the house, the bathroom specifically. It has been averaging in the mid to high nineties (Fahrenheit) outside lately and hasn't rained in weeks. Plus Texas is still going through a severe drought for the past several years. Cave crickets can damage cloth instead a home, like carpets and drapes. They also will eat just about anything edible, from decaying plant matter to dog food. These insects can actually become a pest and invade dark, damp areas of a home, like a basement. This video is short but captures this neat-looking insect.

 
     
  Camel Cricket (Rhaphidophoridae: Ceuthophilus) Dorsal View
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Sep 9, 2011

Photographed at Grand Forks, North Dakota (07 September 2011).

 
     

 

Camcorder

         

Visitor Sightings

   
Share your sighting of this insect.

Jason And Amanda Alexander
9/2/2016

Location: Centennial, Colorado

camel cricket (Ceuthophilus sp.)


Bill Reynolds
10/3/2014

Location: Pennington Co MN

While trapping pocket gophers in my garden, this little fella hopped out.

camel cricket (Ceuthophilus sp.)


     
     
 

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