common scorpionfly

(Panorpa spp.)

               
Overview

Panorpa is a diverse genus of common scorpionflies. There are about 260 species worldwide, 54 species in North America north of Mexico, and at least 12 species in Minnesota. It occurs in Europe, in Asia, in Mexico, and in eastern United States and adjacent Canadian provinces. It is fairly common in eastern Minnesota, where it is at the western extent of its range. Larvae feed on dead insects and other organic material. They live in burrows in the ground, coming out only to hunt for insect prey. Adults are found in moist deciduous woodlands on vegetation near the ground. They feed mostly on dead or dying insects, sometimes also on fruits and nectar.

common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)

  Photo by Alfredo Colon
Identification

Panorpa are moderate-sized scorpionflies. Adults are slender and range from to 1 (9 to 25 mm) long. Most have tan bodies and are ½ to ¾ (12 to 20 mm) in length. The wings are clear with black spots and bands and with many cross-veins. They are held swept back but widely separated when at rest. On the male the genitalia are large and bulbous. They curve upward and forward at the tip of the abdomen, resembling a scorpion. On the female the abdomen is straight and tapers to a slender tip. The antennae are long and thread-like. The face is extremely elongated downward into a long snout. The legs are long and slender. The last part of the leg (tarsus), corresponding to the foot, has two claws. The larva resembles a caterpillar.

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 7, 24, 27, 29, 30.

 
Comments

No Common Name
This genus has no common name. The common name for the family Panorpidae is common scorpionflies, and is applied here for the sake of convenience.

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Mecoptera (scorpionflies and hangingflies)

 

Family:

Panorpidae (common scorpionflies)

 

Genus:

Panorpa

 
Subordinate Taxa

common scorpionfly (Panorpa anomala)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa banksi)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa claripennis)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa galerita)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa insolens)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa nebulosa)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa setifera)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa sigmoides)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa speciosa)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa subfurcata)

common scorpionfly (Panorpa submaculosa)

Helen’s scorpionfly (Panorpa helena)

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

no common name

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Tarsus

The last two to five subdivisions of an insect’s leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. Plural: tarsi.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Alfredo Colon
       

Male

  common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)   common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)
       
  common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)   common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)
       

Female

  common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)   common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)
       
  common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)   common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)
       
  common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)   common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)
       
  common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)   common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)
       
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
   
       
       

 

Camera

     
Slideshows
   
  common scorpionfly (Panorpa) 2
Bill Keim
 
  common scorpionfly (Panorpa) 2  
     
  common scorpionfly (Panorpa) 1
Bill Keim
 
  common scorpionfly (Panorpa) 1  
     
  Scorpionfly (Genus Panorpa)
Andree Reno Sanborn
 
  Scorpionfly (Genus Panorpa)  
     

 

slideshow

       
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Other Videos
 
  Scorpionfly - female and male (Mecoptera Panorpidae Panorpa)
Nature in Motion
 
   
 
About

Dec 4, 2016

The first clip shows the female and the rest show the male. I tried to identify the species group, but could not be confident enough to include. I learned that Scorpionflies are difficult to find, difficult to photograph and difficult to identify to the species group. They are differentiated by the male genitalia and my footage isn't quite clear enough for my level of experience. Filmed in the Missouri Ozarks (USA). Mecoptera (Scorpionflies, Hangingflies and Allies) » Panorpidae (Common Scorpionflies) » Panorpa

Music: Cartoon Pizzicato - Comedy by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://incompetech.com/

   
       

 

Camcorder

         
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Alfredo Colon
8/20/2019

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)


Alfredo Colon
8/16 to 8/18/2019

Location: Slinger, Wisconsin

common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)


Alfredo Colon
8/15/2019

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)


Alfredo Colon
8/14/2019

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)


Alfredo Colon
8/13/2019

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

common scorpionfly (Panorpa sp.)


 
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Created: 2/10/2020

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