Purple Finch

(Haemorhous purpureus)

Conservation Status
Purple Finch
Photo by Luciearl
  IUCN Red List

LC - Least Concern

     
  NatureServe

N5B, N5N - Secure Breeding and Nonbreeding

SNRB, SNRN - Unranked Breeding and Nonbreeding

     
  Minnesota

not listed

     
           
 
Description
 
 

Males have a red head, nape, throat, breast, and rump; reddish-brown cheek; brown and red streaked back and flanks; and a distinctly notched tail. Females are brown with no red. Their underparts are heavily streaked.

 
     
 

Size

 
 

5¼ to 5 in length

10 wingspan

 
     
 

Voice

 
   
     
 

Similar Species

 
     
     
 
Habitat
 
 

Breeding: Open coniferous and mixed forests

Migration: Open coniferous, deciduous, and mixed forests and forest edges, shrubby open areas, parks, suburban areas

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Migration

 
 

Late February to late May and mid-July to late November

 
     
 

Nesting

 
 

 

 
     
 

Food

 
 

Insects in the spring, fruits in the summer, and seeds in the winter

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Occurrence

 
 

Common migrant in the east, uncommon in the west; uncommon to locally common breeder; widespread winter visitor

 
         
 

Maps

 
 

The Minnesota Ornithologists’ Union All Seasons Species Occurrence Map

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
  Class Aves (birds)  
 

Order

Passeriformes (perching birds)  
 

Family

Fringillidae (true finches)  
  Subfamily Carduelinae  
 

Genus

Haemorhous (American rosefinches)  
       
 

This bird was formerly placed with the Old World finches in the genus Carpodacus.

 
       
 

Subordinate Taxa

 
 

Eastern Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus purpureus)

Western Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus californicus)

 
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

Carpodacus purpureus

 
       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       
Visitor Photos
   

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Ramona Abrego
       
  Purple Finch   Purple Finch
       
  Purple Finch    
       
Luciearl
       
  Purple Finch   Purple Finch
       
Laurie Wachholz
       
  Purple Finch    
       
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
   
       
       
       

 

Camera

     
Slideshows
   
  Purple Finch
JMC Nature Photos
 
  Purple Finch  
     
  30063 Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus)
Bill Keim
 
  30063 Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus)  

 

slideshow

       
Visitor Videos
   

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Other Videos
 
  Purple Finch
Larry Bond
 
   
 
About

Published on Nov 6, 2014

Fairly common. Coniferous forests, mixed open woods, suburban areas, feeders in winter.

Male is a brilliant red over most of body. Striped back. White belly.

Female is very sparrow-like; dull brown and heavily streaked above and below. Similar to female House Finch and female Cassin's Finch. Told from House Finch by its distinctive ear patch and eyebrow stripe.

Song: long, loud, fast, excited, burbling warble; distinctive sharp musical "chip" given in flight.

For more information visit:
http://ebirdr.com/bird/purple-finch

   
       
  Purple Finch vs House Finch comparison with feeder birds
Roger Tory Peterson Institute of Natural History
 
   
 
About

Published on Dec 15, 2014

Here we have a female Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus) feeding throughout the video along with a female House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) and a male House Finch later on. A Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) and Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) also make an appearance among the common feeder birds visiting this tray of sunflower seeds. Note that the female Purple Finch is larger and bulkier than her House Finch counterpart. She has more boldly defined colors in all regards with additional heavier and stronger facial and head markings. Take a watch to get a feel for it! Doesn't their identification certainly seem much easier when they are close-up, stationary and alongside one another? If only all birding were that simple.

   
       
  Purple finch : Male, female, song at the end
Annie G - Oiseaux et nature
 
   
 
About

Published on Jun 16, 2017

Purple finch : Male, female, song of the bird at the END of the vidoo

Filmed with Nikon Coolpix P900

Beach Party - Islandesque par Kevin MacLeod est protégée par une licence Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

Source : https://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100613

Artiste : http://incompetech.com/

   
       

 

Camcorder

         
Visitor Sightings
   
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Ramona Abrego
3/27/2019

Location: Becker County

Purple Finch


Luciearl
2/12/2019

Location: Cass County

Purple Finch


     
     
 
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Created: 2/13/2019

Last Updated:

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