Snowy Owl

(Bubo scandiacus)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

LC - Least Concern

 

No Image Available

NatureServe

N4B, N4N - Apparently Secure Breeding and Nonbreeding

SNRN - Unranked Nonbreeding

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Rare and local migrant and winter visitor

Habitat

Prairie, marshes, agricultural fields, pastures, airports, and other open areas with fence posts, utility poles, or other perches

Size

20 to 27 in length

54 to 72 wingspan


Identification

The female is white with prominent dark dark brown spots and bars. The male is similar but with very little dark marking. Both males and females lose some of the dark marking as they age. Older males are often almost completely white.

 
Voice

 

 
Similar
Species

No similar species


Food

Mostly voles and mice, but also grouse, hares, and weasels. Rarely songbirds.

 
Nesting

Nests in the arctic tundra of northern Canada and Alaska.

 
Migration

Early October to mid-April


Comments

Taxonomy
This owl was originally named Strix scandiaca by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. It was later moved into its own genus, and given the name Nyctea scandiaca, based on distinct plumage and minor skeletal differences. Mitochondrial DNA analysis in 2002 showed that the bird is closely related to the horned owls and it was moved to the genus Bubo.


Taxonomy

Order:

Strigiformes (owls)

 

Family:

Strigidae (typical owls)

 

Subfamily:

Striginae

 
Synonyms

Bubo scandiaca

Bubo virginianus wapacuthu

Nyctea scandiaca


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

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  Snowy Owl
JMC Nature Photos
 
  Snowy Owl  
     
  Snowy Owl
tim kuhn
 
  Snowy Owl  
     
  Snowy Owl 2011-2014
Gene Harriman
 
  Snowy Owl 2011-2014  
     
  Snowy Owls
Peter Thiemann
 
  Snowy Owls  

 

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Other Videos

 
  NATURE | Magic of the Snowy Owl | Owl of the Arctic | PBS
PBS
 
   
 
About

Published on Oct 17, 2012

Watch the full-length episode at http://video.pbs.org/video/2291436455

In the dim glow of the Arctic glow, the true majesty of the snowy owl can be seen in its frozen, white kingdom. There is little relief from the constant wind. For adult snowies, the lengthening daylight means the chance to breed is drawing closer. "Magic of the Snowy Owl" premieres Wednesday, October 24 at 8/7c (check local listings) and is part of the 31st season of the Peabody and Emmy award-winning series produced by Thirteen in association with WNET for PBS. Major support provided by Canon U.S.A. Inc.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/magic-of-the-snowy-owl/preview/7833/

 
     
  BBC Documentray 2015 || Snowy Owl || National Geographic Documentray || BBC Animals
Lee K. Snyder
 
   
 
About

Published on Jul 14, 2015

BBC Documentray 2015 || Snowy Owl || National Geographic Documentray || BBC Animals

 
     
  Snowy Owl Invasion
LabofOrnithology
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Dec 22, 2011

Snowy Owls lead nomadic lives and travel vast distances from year to year searching for productive feeding areas. Some years, most recently in the winter of 2011/2012, conditions cause them to come south in great numbers.

Get an intimate look at these white owls from the north through video and photographs captured by the Cornell Lab's, Gerrit Vyn.

 
     
  Snowy Owl Rescue & Release - Cape Wildlife Center
The Humane Society of the United States
 
   
 
About

Published on Feb 24, 2014

Snowy owls, made famous by Harry Potter's Hedwig, have visited the U.S. in record numbers this year. The HSUS's Cape Wildlife Center, one of New England's largest wildlife rehabilitation facilities, has successfully treated and released one of these magnificent creatures.

 
     
  Snowy Owl Hooting
groenelantaarn
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Mar 29, 2011

Bubo scandiaca hooting
vogelpark walsrode germany

 
     

 

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