belted springtail

(Orchesella cincta)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

belted springtail

 

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Uncommon in Minnesota

Flight/Season

 

Habitat

Soil, leaf litter, moss, under stones, in rotting wood

Size

Total Length: (4 mm)

Photo by Alfredo Colon
 
Identification

Belted springtail is a large slender springtail. It occurs in western Europe, southern Canada, and northern United States. It is one of the most common and one of the largest springtails in the United Kingdom. Based on the number of records, it is uncommon in Minnesota. However, it is probably underreported due to its small size and habitat preferences. It is found in soil, leaf litter, rotting wood, and moss, under stones, and on tree trunks.

Adults are elongated, slender, and small, about (4 mm) long. The head, thorax, abdomen, and legs are covered with long, stiff, erect hairs. They are not covered with scales. The color is variable and may be mostly reddish-brown, brown, or blackish-brown.

The head is small. On each side of the head there is a cluster of 7 simple eyes (ocelli) and no compound eyes. The ocelli are minute, no more than 10 microns in diameter. The antennae have 6 segments. Segments 1 and 2 are subdivided. The end of the second segment is white. The third segment is entirely dark and short, much shorter than the second and fourth segments. The fifth and sixth segments are brown. The sixth segment is often missing on just one antenna, suggesting damage earlier in life. First instars have just 4 antennal segments.

The thorax has 3 segments, the abdomen 6 segments. There is not a thin black line in the middle through the last two thoracic segments and the first three abdominal segments.

The first abdominal segment is short. The second segment has a white band on the rear margin. The band may be narrow or may cover half or more of the segment. The third segment is very dark, making the abdomen appear “belted”. This is the source of the common name of the species. The fourth segment is enlarged and has a forked, tail-like appendage on the underside that allows it to jump.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Food

 

 
Life Cycle

Belted springtails molt throughout their lives, alternating between feeding instars and reproducing instars. When conditions are dry they will cease molting and reproducing until conditions improve. Reproduction is synchronized across a population.

 
Behavior

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24, 29, 30, 82.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Class:

Collembola (springtails)

 

Order:

Entomobryomorpha (elongate-bodied springtails)

 

Superfamily:

Entomobryoidea

 

Family:

Entomobryidae (slender springtails)

 

Subfamily:

Orchesellinae

 

Genus:

Orchesella

 
Synonyms

Orchesella vaga

Podura cincta

 
Common
Names

belted springtail

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Instar

The developmental stage of arthropods between each molt; in insects, the developmental stage of the larvae or nymph.

 

Ocellus

Simple eye; an eye with a single lens. Plural: ocelli.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Alfredo Colon
       
  belted springtail    
       
       
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
   
       
       

 

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Other Videos
 
  Springschwanz/-tail - Orchesella cincta - Collembola
AO1Uta
 
   
 
About

Jan 18, 2011

0.16 inches springtail and bugs on wooden fence / 4 mm Laufspringer auf dem Gartenzaun

Gefilmt am 05.+13. November 2010

   
       
  Identifying: Magnificent Springtails (Orchesella)
James McCulloch
 
   
 
About

Aug 5, 2020

In this video I introduce one of the more eye-catching springtail genera: Orchesella! Including tips on how to recognise the genus and how to separate the British species.

The Collembola Recording Scheme: https://www.brc.ac.uk/scheme/collembola-recording-scheme

If anyone has any springtail ID questions, do get in touch! You can find me on Twitter at @My_Wild_Life.

   
       
  Orchesella cincta 68
Philippe Caillon
 
   
 
About

Mar 22, 2013

   
       
       
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Alfredo Colon
8/19/2019

Location: Woodbury, MN

belted springtail


 
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Created: 12/9/2020

Last Updated:

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