Violet-toothed Polypore

(Trichaptum biforme)

Conservation Status
Violet-toothed Polypore
 
  IUCN Red List

not listed

 
  NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

 
  Minnesota

not listed

 
           
           
           
 
Description
 
 

Violet-toothed Polypore is a common and widespread bracket fungus. It occurs in Europe, western Asia, Australia, South America, and North America. It is one of the most commonly encountered fungi in eastern North America, more common than the seemingly ubiquitous Turkey Tail. It is uncommon in the west and mostly absent from the Great Plains. In Minnesota it is common in the east, uncommon in the northwest, and absent from the southwest. It is found in late spring, summer, and fall in deciduous and mixed forests and woodlands. It grows on dead and fallen sticks, branches, and logs, and on stumps. It appears alone or in overlapping clusters, sometimes in a large mass completely covering a rotting log. It obtains its nutrients from dead wood (saprobic).

The fruiting body is a to 3 (1.0 to 7.5 cm) wide, up to (3 mm) thick, shelf-like or bracket-like cap. It is flattened, only slightly convex, and may be fan-shaped, semi-circular, kidney-shaped, or irregular in outline. When it first appears the cap is shades of violet from dark to pale. The violet color soon fades. The mature cap is velvety hairy on the upper side and concentrically zoned with white, grayish-white, and brownish-white. The margin is sometimes pale violet. Older caps may be mostly hairless.

The pore surface is pore-like at first, with 2 to 5, violet-colored pores per centimeter. As it ages it becomes tooth-like and the violet color fades to buff or brown. The violet color fades from the center outward. Mature specimens often retain some violet tints near the margin, or just a thin violet fringe. Older specimens don’t show any trace of violet.

The flesh is tough and inedible.

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
     
     
 
Habitat and Hosts
 
 

Deciduous and mixed forests and woodlands. Hardwoods.

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Season

 
 

Late spring, summer, and fall

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

4, 7, 24, 26, 29, 30, 77.

 
  6/19/2022      
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

Common in Minnesota

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
  Kingdom Fungi (fungi)  
  Subkingdom Dikarya  
  Phylum Basidiomycota (club fungi)  
  Subphylum Agaricomycotina (jelly fungi, yeasts, and mushrooms)  
  Class Agaricomycetes (mushroom-forming fungi)  
  No Rank Agaricomycetes incertae sedis (no subclass)  
 

Order

Hymenochaetales  
 

No Rank

Hymenochaetales incertae sedis (no family)  
 

Genus

Trichaptum  
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

Coriolus biformis

Hirschioporus friesii 

Hirschioporus pergamenus

Microporellus friesii

Polyporus biformis

Polyporus elongatus

Polyporus laceratus

Polyporus pergamenus

Polyporus xalapensis

Trametes biformis

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

Violet-toothed Bracket Fungus

Violet-toothed Polypore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Saprobic

Obtaining nutrients from non-living organic matter, such as decaying plant or animal matter.

 
 
Visitor Photos
 
           
 

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Luciearl

 
    Violet-toothed Polypore      
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
 
    Violet-toothed Polypore   Violet-toothed Polypore  
           
    Violet-toothed Polypore   Violet-toothed Polypore  
           
    Violet-toothed Polypore   Violet-toothed Polypore  
           
    Violet-toothed Polypore   Violet-toothed Polypore  

 

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slideshow

       
 
Visitor Videos
 
       
 

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Other Videos
 
  Trichaptum biforme (Violet toothed polypore)
Carly Becker
 
   
 
About

Jun 21, 2020

Key Disease and Pest Video Compendium 2

Plant Pathology 5060 at OSU

   
  Trichaptum Biforme "Purple Tooth" Fungus
cutlerylover
 
   
 
About

Nov 26, 2013

Interesting...

   
  Trichaptum biforme is a species of fungus which decompose hardwood
Slavko Pavlovic
 
   
 
About

Apr 23, 2017

   
  Polypore Fungi (Trichaptum biforme) on Tree Trunk
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Apr 23, 2011

Photographed at the Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (23 April 2010).

   

 

Camcorder

 
 
Visitor Sightings
 
           
 

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  Luciearl
7/21/2020

Location: Cass County

Violet-toothed Polypore  
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Sightings
 
   

 

 

Binoculars


Created: 12/22/2020

Last Updated:

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