grass spider

(Agelenopsis spp.)

Overview
grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)
 
 

Agelenopsis is a genus of funnel web weaver spiiders. They are called grass spiders because their conspicuous webs are often seen in grass. There are fourteen currrently recognized species of grass spiders. All occur in North America north of Mexico. At least three species occur in Minnesota.

Grass spiders are found in woodlands and grassy areas, low in bushes, in stone piles and gardens, and in corners of buildings, both outdoors and indoors.

Like all spiders, grass spiders are venomous, but they are not poisonous to humans. They will not bite unless handled.

 
           
 
Description
 
 

Females are to (10 to 17 mm) in length not including the legs. Males are just a little smaller, to (9 to 15 mm) long.

The top of the front segment (carapace) has 3 pale and 2 dark horizontal stripes. Like other funnel-web spiders, the spinnerets extend well beyond the end of the rear segment (abdomen), and are visible from above.

The web is a horizontal, non-sticky sheet with a funnel near one edge or in the middle.

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

7, 24, 29, 30, 82.

 
  10/16/2021      
         
 
Taxonomy
 
  Class Arachnida (arachnids)  
 

Order

Araneae (spiders)  
 

Suborder

Araneomorphae (typical spiders)  
  Infraorder Entelegynae (entelegyne spiders)  
 

Superfamily

Agelenoidea (funnel weavers and amphinectids)  
 

Family

Agelenidae (funnel weavers)  
 

Subfamily

Ageleninae  
 

Genus

Agelenopsis (grass spiders)  
       
 

Subordinate Taxa

 
 

birthmark grass funnel weaver (Agelenopsis naevia)

common American grass spider (Agelenopsis actuosa)

common grass funnel weaver (Agelenopsis potteri)

desert grass spider (Agelenopsis aperta)

Emerton’s grass funnel weaver (Agelenopsis emertoni)

grass spider (Agelenopsis aleenae)

grass spider (Agelenopsis kastoni)

grass spider (Agelenopsis longistyla)

grass spider (Agelenopsis riechertae)

grass spider (Agelenopsis spatula)

Oklahoma grass funnel weaver (Agelenopsis oklahoma)

Oregon grass funnel weaver (Agelenopsis oregonensis)

Pennsylvania grass funnel weaver (Agelenopsis pennsylvanica)

Utah grass funnel weaver (Agelenopsis utahana)

 
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

 

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

grass spiders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Carapace

On spiders, the top of the cephalothorax.

 

Cephalothorax

The front part of a spider’s body, composed of the head region and the thoracic area. Eyes, legs, and antennae are attached to this part.

 

 

 
 
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Mary Jo Reuter

 
 

Grass Spider

It is about 3/4” body with the main part that has two black parts with a white stripe down the middle, the abdomen is dark grayish. Has very long legs, two antennas next to the weird eyes. The legs look translucent except it has dark markings on the legs also. I sent three pictures to this email address also today.

  grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)  
           
 

Please I would appreciate if this is not a grass spider to let me know asap, as I have to take out my AC units and have the window edges taped up heavily because I don’t want that coming into my house!! I am deathly afraid of spiders and may have to move if that comes in until it is found!!

  grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)  
           
 

At first I thought this was a brown recluse because I could not see close enough if that was a violin on its main part. But today I was finally able to shoot a picture and zoom in enough to see it did not appear to be a violin and was thankful that it was not a brown recluse...from my uneducated guess.

  grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)  
           
 

Any suggestions how to get him out as it will probably run right into the seam where the window and window frame meet.

  grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)  
           
 

His fangs are about 1/8th “ as I was able to get a good picture of those last night.

  grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)  
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
 
 

Spider

 
    grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)      
           
 

Web

 
    grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)      
           
 

Funnel

 
    grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)      
           

 

Camera

     
 
Slideshows
 
 
     
     

 

slideshow

       
 
Visitor Videos
 
       
 

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Other Videos
 
  American Grass Spider facts: the harmless funnel weavers | Animal Fact Files
Animal Fact Files
 
   
 
About

Mar 4, 2020

American grass spiders are often known as the spiders who enter our homes as the season begins to get cold. Sometimes they're mistaken for spiders who pack more of a punch when they bite a human because grass spiders construct webs in the same way these other spiders do, but grass spiders are considered harmless. They may also be known as funnel weaver spiders due to the shape of their webs. A grass spider can move fast and uses its lightning speed to catch prey that has fallen into its web.

Scientific Name: Genus - Agelenopsis
Range: Canada to Mexico
Size: more than an inch (2.54cm) including their legs
Diet: insects and other arthropods and invertebrates
Lifespan: Less than a year

 
  Grass Spider (Agelenidae: Agelenopsis) on Nest
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Aug 5, 2010

Photographed at Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (04 August 2010).

 
  Agelenopsis "species" Funnel Web Weaver feeding
Ron's Spiders
 
   
 
About

Jul 26, 2018

I just caught this spider yesterday and was going to wait a few days for some webbing to happen before feeding it. By the time someone asked me to record this, I was already in the process of doing it. These spiders are very, very fast. Cool little guys.

 

 

Camcorder

 
 
Visitor Sightings
 
           
 

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  Mary Jo Reuter
10/16/2021

Location: Lindstrom, MN, Chisago County

Any suggestions how to get him out as it will probably run right into the seam where the window and window frame meet. His fangs are about 1/8th “ as I was able to get a good picture of those last night.

grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)  
  Mary Jo Reuter
10/15/2021

Location: Inbetween my windows, Lindstrom, MN/Chisago County. My AC unit

It is about 3/4” body with the main part that has two black parts with a white stripe down the middle, the abdomen is dark grayish. Has very long legs, two antennas next to the weird eyes. The legs look translucent except it has dark markings on the legs also. I sent three pictures to this email address also today.

Please I would appreciate if this is not a grass spider to let me know asap, as I have to take out my AC units and have the window edges taped up heavily because I don’t want that coming into my house!! I am deathly afraid of spiders and may have to move if that comes in until it is found!!

At first I thought this was a brown recluse because I could not see close enough if that was a violin on its main part. But today I was finally able to shoot a picture and zoom in enough to see it did not appear to be a violin and was thankful that it was not a brown recluse...from my uneducated guess.

grass spider (Agelenopsis sp.)  
  John Valo
10/15/2021

It is not a brown recluse, as you noted.

Wolf spiders and grass spiders looks similar, but wolf spiders don't make webs. This is a grass spider. Here is information from Smith's Pest Management:

While grass spiders are not poisonous, they (like all spiders) are venomous. In most cases, their venom is not a risk of people. Instead of biting unsuspecting gardeners, grass spiders use their venom to subdue prey. Grass spiders have very small fangs that cannot generally puncture human skin. Aug 27, 2021

 
           
 
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