Black Trumpet

(Craterellus fallax)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

Black Trumpet

NatureServe

not listed

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common and widespread

Season

July to October

Habitat/Hosts

On the ground in deciduous or mixed woodlands. Oak, beech, and possibly other hardwoods.


Identification

This is a common and widespread, edible mushroom. It occurs across North America but is especially common in the east. It fruits on the ground, scattered or in groups, in deciduous and mixed woodlands. It obtains its nutrients from the rootlets of oak, beech, and possibly other hardwood trees (mycorrhizal). It is often missed because its shape and color allows it to blend in with its surroundings. It sometimes stands out in sharp relief against a carpet of moss.

The fruiting body is more or less trumpet-shaped. There is no sharp distinction between the stalk and the cap.

The stalk is tough, hollow except at the very base, tapered, to 2 long, and 3 16 to wide. It is the same color or slightly paler than the underside of the cap.

The cap is shaped like a funnel, 1¼ to 3½ high, and ¾ to 3 or more wide. It is tapered, hollow in the center, and broadly spread outwards at the top. The margins curved downwards, becoming wavy at maturity and splitting with age. The upper side is finely scaly, pale brown to grayish-brown when dry, dark brown to black when moist.

The underside is smooth or slightly wrinkled, and colored similar tho the cap but paler. There are no gills. At maturity it is covered with a whitish spore dust with yellowish or orangish tints.

The flesh is thin, tough, brittle, and grayish-brown or colored like the cap. It has a fruity fragrance reminiscent of apricots.

The spore print is whitish to pinkish-orange or yellowish.

 
Similar
Species

Ashen Chanterelle (Cantharellus cinereus) underside is bluish-black or bluish gray and conspicuously wrinkled with shallow, primitive gills.

Blue Chanterelle (Polyozellus multiplex) cap is tinted purple or dark blue.

Horn of Plenty (Craterellus cornucopioides) has a white spore print but is otherwise indistinguishable. It is common in Europe but much rarer in North America.


Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 4, 7, 26, 29, 77.


Comments

 


Taxonomy

Division:

Basidiomycota (club fungi)

 

Subdivision:

Agaricomycotina (jelly fungi, yeasts, and mushrooms)

 

Class:

Agaricomycetes (mushroom-forming fungi)

 

No Rank:

Agaricomycetes incertae sedis

 

Order:

Cantharellales

 

Family:

Cantharellaceae

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

Black Trumpet


 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

mycorrhizal

A symbiotic, usually beneficial relationship between a fungus and the tiny rootlets of a plant, usually a tree.

       

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Published on Jan 23, 2015

Craterellus fallax - fungi kingdom

 
     

 

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