Eastern North American Destroying Angel

(Amanita bisporigera)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

Eastern North American Destroying Angel

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Widely distributed and common

Season

Summer and fall

Habitat/Hosts

On the ground near oak trees

   
    Photo by Jeffrey M. Arsenault
 
Identification

Eastern North American Destroying Angel is a common, medium-sized, deadly poisonous, gilled mushroom. As the common name implies, it occurs in eastern North America, specifically in the United States east of the Great Plains, in adjacent Canadian provinces, and in Mexico and Central America. It is found in deciduous and mixed woodlands in the summer and fall, alone, scattered, or in groups. It grows on the ground near oak trees and possibly other hardwoods. It is mycorrhizal, obtaining its nutrients from the rootlets of a tree while facilitating greater absorption of nutrients from the soil by the tree.

Eastern North American Destroying Angel is a tall white mushroom on a slender stalk. The cap on young mushrooms is oval or nearly round at first, becoming broadly convex then ultimately nearly flat at maturity. The mature cap is is 1 to 4 in diameter. The upper surface is hairless and usually dry to the touch, sticky when moist. It is white, rarely becoming yellowish or pinkish, and sometimes darkening in the center with age. There are no patches or warts on the surface. The margin is not lined with grooves (striated) and does not have remnants of the universal veil.

The stalk is solid, 2316 to 5½ (5.5 to 14 cm) tall, and 316 to ¾ (5 to 20 mm) thick. It tapers slightly to the top and has an expanded, cup-like base (volva) up to 1½ in height. The volva is a remnant of a protective, egg-like covering (universal veil) that completely envelopes the developing mushroom when young. It may be partially or completely buried in the ground. The volva sometimes breaks up as the stalk expands. Near the top of the stalk, below the cap and gills, is a membranous ring. This is the remnant of a protective covering (partial veil) of the developing gills.

The gills are white, closely spaced or crowded, and free, not attached to the stalk. Between adjacent gills there is frequently another short gill.

The flesh is white and deadly poisonous, not edible. Young mushrooms have no odor. Older mushrooms have a sickly sweet smell like rotting meat.

The spore print is white.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 4, 24, 26, 29, 30, 77.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Division:

Basidiomycota (club fungi)

 

Subdivision:

Agaricomycotina (jelly fungi, yeasts, and mushrooms)

 

Class:

Agaricomycetes (mushroom-forming fungi)

 

Subclass:

Agaricomycetidae

 

Order:

Agaricales (gill mushrooms)

 

Family:

Amanitaceae (Amanita)

 

Genus:

Amanita

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

Destroying Angel

Eastern North American Destroying Angel

North American Destroying Angel

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Mycorrhizal

A symbiotic, usually beneficial relationship between a fungus and the tiny rootlets of a plant, usually a tree.

 

Partial veil

A protective covering over the gills or pores of a developing mushroom. At maturity it disappears, collapses into a ring around the stem, or wears away into a cobwebby covering and ring zone.

 

Striate

Striped or grooved in parallel lines (striae).

 

Universal veil

An egg-like structure that envelopes all or most of a developing gill mushroom. Remnants of the universal veil sometimes visible on a mature mushroom are patchy warts on the cap, a ring on the stem, and a volva at the base of the stem.

 

Volva

Also called cup. A cup-like covering at the base of a mushroom stem, sometimes buried. In Amanita, Volvariella, and some other mushrooms, it is the remnants of the universal veil ruptured by the mushroom pushing through. In Phallales it is the remnants of the ruptured peridium.

       
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FMF CHOP
       

White spore print. Found in grass near dying maple.

  Eastern North American Destroying Angel   Eastern North American Destroying Angel
       
Jeffrey M. Arsenault
       
  Eastern North American Destroying Angel   Eastern North American Destroying Angel
       
       
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Other Videos
 
  One Poisonous Mushroom | One Poisonous Plant
Learn Your Land
 
   
 
About

Aug 23, 2017

In this video, we take a look at the lethal Destroying Angel mushroom (Amanita bisporigera/amerivirosa) and the toxic White Snake Root plant (Ageratina altissima).

Music: Small Tall Order — Poison In The Water https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/legalcode

Follow Adam Haritan online here:
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  Amanita Mushroom (Amanita bisporigera)
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Jul 8, 2010

"Such quiet under the small leaves!-- / Near the stem, whiter at root, / A luminous stillness. / The shade speaks slowly: / 'Adore and draw near. / Who knows this-- / Knows all.'"-- Theodore Roethke Photographed at the Rydell NWR, Minnesota (07 July 2010). Click here to learn more: http://www.mushroomexpert.com/amanita_bisporigera.html

   
       

 

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Jeffrey M. Arsenaul
7/14/2020

Location: Mankato

Eastern North American Destroying Angel


 
         
         
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Created: 7/31/2020

Last Updated:

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