Smooth Axil-bristle Lichen

(Myelochroa galbina)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

Smooth Axil-bristle Lichen

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common in eastern United States and in northern Minnesota

Habitat/Hosts

Open woods, roadsides. Hardwood trees.

   
    Photo by Luciearl

Identification

This is a small to medium-sized lichen that grows on the bark of deciduous trees, rarely on rock.

The vegetative body (thallus) is leaf-like (foliose) and divided into lobes. It is attached to the substrate (bark) by abundant, uniformly distributed, black, usually unbranched, anchoring structures (rhizines). The lobes are 1 32 to 1 16 (0.8 to 2 mm) in diameter, flat, and closely appressed to the substrate. The upperside is pale gray to bluish-gray and wrinkled or corrugated in the center. The surface has neither powdery dull granules (soredia) nor shiny granules (isidia). The underside is black. There are short, black, hair-like appendages in the axils of the lobes and sometimes also on the margins. These may not be visible without a hand lens. The interior of the thallus is divided into two layers. The lower layer (medulla) is yellowish, though this may be difficult to see except under the apothecia.

Disk-like, spore-producing structures (apothecia) are usually abundant. The disks are 1 16to 3 16 in diameter, reddish-brown, and shaped like a plate. Each disk has a ring of tissue around it that resembles the tissue of the vegetative (non-fruiting) part of the lichen.

 
Similar
Species

Powdery Axil-bristle Lichen (Myelochroa aurulenta) has dull, powdery granules (soredia) on the surface that can be easily brushed off.

Rock Axil-bristle Lichen (Myelochroa obsessa) grows only on rocks. The surface is somewhat shiny and is covered with shiny granules (isidia).


Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 4, 24, 26, 29, 30, 77.


Comments

 


Taxonomy

Division:

Ascomycota (sac fungi)

 

No Rank:

saccharomyceta

 

Subdivision:

Pezizomycotina

 

No Rank:

leotiomyceta

 

Class:

Lecanoromycetes

 

Subclass:

Lecanoromycetidae

 

Order:

Lecanorales

 

Suborder:

Lecanorineae

 

Family:

Parmeliaceae

 

Mycobiont:

Myelochroa galbina

 

Photobiont:

 

 
Synonyms

Parmelina galbina

 
Common
Names

Smooth Axil-bristle Lichen


 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Apothecium

An open, disk-shaped or cup-shaped, reproductive structure, with spore sacs on the upper surface, that produces spores for the fungal partner of a lichen. Plural: apothecia.

 

Foliose

Adjective: Leaf-like growth form; referring to lichens with leaf-like growths divided into lobes.
Noun: The leaf-like, vegetative body of a lichen (thallus) that has thin, flat lobes which are free from the substrate.

 

Isidium

The reproductive structure of a lichen consisting of a cluster of algal cells (the photobiont) wrapped in fungal filaments (the mycobiont) and enclosed within a layer of protective tissue (cortex). Plural: insidia.

 

Rhizine

A root-like structure of a lichen that attaches the lower layer to the substrate.

 

Soredium

The reproductive structure of a lichen consisting of a cluster of algal cells (the photobiont) wrapped in fungal filaments (the mycobiont). Plural: soredia.

 

Thallus

The vegetative body of a lichen composed of both the alga and the fungus.

       

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Luciearl


  Smooth Axil-bristle Lichen    

       
       
       

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Luciearl
8/29/2018

Location: Cass County

Smooth Axil-bristle Lichen


     
     
 

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