crimson erineum mite

(Aceria elongatus)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

crimson erineum mite

NatureServe

not listed

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common in Eastern North America

Flight/Season

Galls visible from early spring to fall

Habitat/Hosts

sugar maple (Acer saccharum)
[sugar maple (A. s. ssp. saccharum) and possibly black maple (A. s. ssp. nigrum)]

Size

Total Length: 0059 to .0085 (150 to 216 microns)


Identification

At only one tenth the width of a human hair in length, a crimson erineum mite (Aceria elongatus) is barely visible to the human eye unaided by magnification. Its claws, dorsal shield markings, and other identifying body features are not. Identification in the field is possible only by noting the properties of the abnormal growths (galls) it produces on its host.

When an individual leaf cell is injured by a mite, it produces a small, nipple-like projection (papilla) on the upper surface of the leaf. The papilla has a rounded tip, visible only with magnification, and is filled with colored fluid. As the mite feeds on adjacent cells, the aggregation of papillae forms a pustule-like, felty patch (erineum). The erinea are usually scattered over the leaf surface, thickest toward the upper (apical) half, and avoiding the major veins. They are greenish-white at first, soon becoming crimson or purplish. They reach their maximum extent, and are most noticeable, in summer.

The infestation is sometimes abundant and can cause leaf distortion and premature leaf drop.

 
Similar
Species

 


Larval Food

 

 
Adult Food

 

 
Life Cycle

The life cycle of the crimson erineum mite involves alternating generations and is adapted to seasonal changes in the host. Overwintering females emerge in early spring from bark where they spent the winter. The migrate to newly developing buds and ride out on new leaf growth. They begin feeding, enter the resulting galls, lay eggs, and die. In late spring and early summer the eggs in the galls hatch, producing white male and female mites (protogynes). In mid-summer, red female mites (deutogynes) are produced. They fill the galls, obscuring the white protogynes. In September, these female deutogynes migrate to bark crevices in stems and twigs, where they will spend the winter.

 
Behavior

 


Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 7, 30.


Comments

 


Taxonomy

Order:

Trombidiformes

 

Suborder:

Prostigmata

 

No Rank:

Eupodina

 

Superfamily:

Eriophyoidea

 

Family:

Eriophyidae (gall mites)

 

Subfamily:

Eriophyinae

 

Tribe:

Aceriini

 
Synonyms

Eriophyes elongatus

 
Common
Names

crimson erineum mite


 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Erineum

A type of plant gall. An abnormal, felt-like growth of hairs on a leaf surface caused by a mite, especially Eriophyes. Plural erinea.

 

Gall

An abnormal growth on a plant produced in response to an insect larva, mite, bacteria, or fungus.

 

Papilla

A tiny, rounded, nipple-like projection on the surface of a leaf or petal.

 

 

 

 

 

       

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  crimson erineum mite   crimson erineum mite
       

Erineum

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