oblong running spider

(Tibellus oblongus)

               
 
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

oblong running spider

 

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Widespread in North America. Common and locally abundant in Minnesota.

Season

May to September

Habitat/Host

Wide range of habitats

Size

Female Body Length: ¼ to

Male Body Length: ¼ to 5 16

Legspan: 11 16 to 1

Photo by Alfredo Colon

Identification

Oblong running spider is a medium-sized spider (Order Araneae) but a large running crab spider (Family Philodromidae). It occurs throughout Europe, Asia, and North America, and is common and locally abundant in Minnesota. It is by far the most common slender crab spider (Genus Tibellus). It is found low on grasses and herbaceous plants in a wide variety of habitats.

The body is long, slender, flattened, and hairy. Females are ¼ to long and have a legspan of 11 16 to 1. Males are darker, more slender, and slightly smaller, ¼ to 5 16 in length.

The covering (carapace) of the front part of the body (cephalothorax) is much longer than wide and has smoothly convex lateral margins. It is light brown to reddish-brown with a broad, dark brown median stripe, and a pair of narrower, faint, lateral stripes. The median stripe is forked at about the midpoint. The head is slightly angled upward. The eight eyes are black, equal in size, and arranged in two rows of four each. The back (posterior) row is strongly curved backward. The two inner eyes in the back row are closer to each other than to the lateral eyes.

The abdomen is very long and cylindrical. It is light yellowish-brown to brown with dark brown markings. There is a broad, dark brown median stripe; a pair of narrower, faint, lateral stripes; and a small black spot near the end (apex) of each lateral stripe. Sometimes there are two black spots on each lateral stripe.

The legs are long, slender, and the same color as the carapace. They do not have dark rings. The fourth (rear) pair is the longest and has three pairs of long spines on the underside of the fourth segment (tibia).

 
Similar
Species

 


Food

 

 
Life Cycle

The female spins a nursery web for its eggs. It guards the web until the young spiderlings have dispersed.

 
Behavior

This spider does not produce a web to catch prey. It hunts actively, running after prey, and passively, lying in wait and ambushing prey.


Distribution Distribution Map   Sources: 24, 27, 29, 30.

Comments

 


Taxonomy

Order:

Araneae (spiders)

 

Suborder:

Araneomorphae

 

No Rank:

Entelegynae (eight-eyed spiders)

 

No Rank:

RTA clade

 

No Rank:

Dionycha

 

Family:

Philodromidae (Running Crab Spiders)

 
Subordinate Taxa

oblong running spider (Tibellus oblongus maculatus)

oblong running spider (Tibellus oblongus oblongus)

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

oblong running spider


 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Carapace

The hard, upper (dorsal), shell-like covering (exoskeleton) of the body or at least the thorax of many arthropods and of turtles and tortoises.

 

Cephalothorax

The front part of a spider’s body, composed of the head region and the thoracic area fused together. Eyes, legs, and antennae are attached to this part.

 

Tibia

The fourth segment of an insect leg, after the femur and before the tarsus (foot).

 

 

       

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Alfredo Colon


  oblong running spider    

       
       

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About

Published on Jan 31, 2011

A Tibellus spp. spider observed with prey in a flower near Slocan, BC. The prey appears to be a Syrphid hoverfly. Tibellus spp. possibly a Tibellus oblongus ? Slender Crab Spider

 
     

 

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Alfredo Colon
6/10/2018

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

oblong running spider


     
     
 

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