swift crab spider

(Mecaphesa celer)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

 

No Image Available

 

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

 

Season

 

Habitat/Host

 

Size

Female Body Length: ¼

Male Body Length:


Identification

 

 
Similar
Species

 


Food

 

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

 


Distribution Distribution Map   Sources: 29, 30.

Comments

Taxonomy
This species was formerly classified as Misumenops celer. Most species in the genus Misumenops, including this one, were moved into the genus Mecaphesa in 2008.


Taxonomy

Order:

Araneae (spiders)

 

Suborder:

Araneomorphae

 

No Rank:

Entelegynae (eight-eyed spiders)

 

No Rank:

RTA clade

 

No Rank:

Dionycha

 

Family:

Thomisidae (crab spiders)

 
Subordinate Taxa

swift crab spider (Mecaphesa celer celer) ?

swift crab spider (Mecaphesa celer olivacea)

swift crab spider (Mecaphesa celer punctata)

 
Synonyms

Misumenops celer

 
Common
Names

common flower crab spider 

swift crab spider


 

 

 

 

 

 

       

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  Mecaphesa Moving Eyes
Joseph T Lapp
 
   
 
About

Published on May 24, 2013

Jumping spiders and crab spiders are among the few spiders that can move their "main" eyes. The main eyes of an eight-eyed spider are the anterior middle two eyes. Here you see the main eyes of an adult male Mecaphesa celer moving. Spiders don't have ball-and-socket eyes like we do. Instead they just move their retinas. Crab spiders make images with these moving eyes, but the images are in focus only at about a centimeter.

Most Mecaphesa celer are pale yellow or tan in color. The green abdomen makes this one unusual. Some young (elementary school) arachnologists found this spider in a patch of ragweed during a program I was conducting in Austin, Texas, on May 23, 2013. It has a body length of 3mm, or just under 1/8 inch.

 
     

 

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