Allard’s ground cricket

(Allonemobius allardi)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

 

No Image Available

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common and widespread but not recorded in Minnesota

Flight/Season

July to frost

   
Habitat

Dry, open, grassy areas, parks, lawns, and roadsides

Size

Male: to 716 (9.2 to 11.2 mm)

Female: to ½ (8.9 to 12.9 mm)

 
 
Identification

Allard’s ground cricket is a small grassland cricket. It occurs in North America from Quebec and Virginia in the east to North Dakota and Kansas in the west, with scattered occurrences farther west. It has been recorded in Wisconsin, North Dakota, and South Dakota, but to date there are no records of it in Minnesota.

Allonemobius ground crickets are difficult to identify from photographs alone but can readily be distinguished by their song. Adults are reddish-brown to blackish-brown. The body is broad and slightly flattened. Females are to ½ (8.9 to 12.9 mm) long, males a little smaller, to 716 (9.2 to 11.2 mm) long.

The head is brown. There is a triangular to oval depressed area just behind the eyes. There are usually two or three dark stripes on the top of the head, but these may be absent. When present, they are obscure or indistinct, not highly contrasting. There are prominent bristles on the top of the head (vertex) and upper part of the face (frons). The lower half of the face is not glossy brownish-black (piceous). The finger-like mouthparts (palpi) are not white. The antennae are long and thread-like.

The exoskeletal plate covering the thorax (pronotum) is widest at the rear and is covered with bristles.

There are two long, spine-like, sensory appendages (cerci) at the tip of the abdomen and 3 or 4 pairs of long movable spines above the tip. On the female the ovipositor is long and cylinder-shaped. The wings cover about three-quarters of the abdomen.

On the hind leg the fourth segment (tibia) has several pairs of long, movable spines. The last part of the leg (tarsus), corresponding to the foot, has 3 segments. On the hind leg the last tarsal segment has two long spurs.

 
Song

The song is soft and high pitched. It is a long series of downward-bending pulses at the rate of 10 to 17 pulses per second, slower at low temperatures. The source of the sound is always the ground, never high in vegetation. It is best distinguished using a spectrogram.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

 

 
Adult Food

 

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24, 29, 30, 82, 83.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets, katydids)

 

Suborder:

Ensifera (long-horned orthoptera)

 

Infraorder:

Gryllidae (crickets)

 

Superfamily:

Grylloidea

 

Family:

Gryllidae (true crickets)

 

Subfamily:

Nemobiinae (ground crickets)

 

Genus:

Allonemobius

 
Synonyms

Nemobius allardi

 
Common
Names

Allard’s ground cricket

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Cercus

One of a pair of small sensory appendages at the end of the abdomen of many insects and other arthropods. In Odonata, one of the upper pair of claspers. Plural: cerci.

 

Frons

The upper part of an insect’s face, roughly corresponding to the forehea

 

Palp

Short for pedipalp. A segmented, finger-like process of an arthropod; one is attached to each maxilla and two are attached to the labium. They function as sense organs in spiders and weapons in scorpions. Plural: palpi.

 

Tarsus

On insects, the last two to five subdivisions of the leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. On spiders, the last segment of the leg. Plural: tarsi.

 

Tibia

The fourth segment of an insect leg, after the femur and before the tarsus (foot). The fifth segment of a spider leg or palp.

 

Vertex

The upper surface of an insect’s head.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Maureen Burkle
       
  Allards ground cricket 01
7/23/2020
 
   
 
About

Rochester, MN.

Amazingly, I think this might be the first time I’ve heard this cricket! Truthfully, my guess is I’ve heard it before, perhaps in fields and from some distance, but up close it sounds far different from average yard field crickets! Wow! Loud and a continual trill.

   
       
       
Other Videos
 
  Allard's Ground Cricket (Allonemobius allardi)
David Brown
 
   
 
About

Aug 9, 2016

Allard's Ground Cricket (Allonemobius allardi) singing.
Montoursville, PA. August 9th, 2016, 1pm
Suburban backyard

Recorded with Sony PCM-M10 and Sennheiser shotgun microphone

   
       
  Allard's Ground Crickets (HD Recommended)
Zachary Frieben
 
   
 
About

Feb 18, 2015

October 8, 2014--Many Allard's Ground Crickets were calling in a strip of thick grass on Oak Street in Three Rivers, MI. I couldn't believe it when one of them was calling right in the open, and it was quite tame! It's amazing that their wings make this beautiful, high-pitched trill. Near the end of the video, a male and a are seen together.

   
       
  cricket singing
qizhong8
 
   
 
About

Feb 29, 2008

the Allard's Ground Cricket

   
       

 

Camcorder

         
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Maureen Burkle
7/23/2020

Location: Rochester, MN

Amazingly, I think this might be the first time I’ve heard this cricket! Truthfully, my guess is I’ve heard it before, perhaps in fields and from some distance, but up close it sounds far different from average yard field crickets! Wow! Loud and a continual trill.


     
     
 
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Created: 8/20/2020

Last Updated:

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