Minnesota True Bugs

 
Order Hemiptera

Hemiptera is the order of insects that is characterized by having piercing and sucking proboscis (mouthparts), and wings that are thickened at the base but membraneous (thin, flexible, and often transparent) at the end. The order includes true bugs, whiteflies, aphids, scales, mealybugs, cicadas, leafhoppers, treehoppers, planthoppers, and spittlebugs.

There are about 80,000 named Hemiptera species in 37 families worldwide, 10,200 species in about 1,600 genera in North America north of Mexico.


green stink bug

 

 

           

Recent Additions

 
Citrus flatid planthopper
  citrus flatid planthopper

A planthopper is an insect in the superfamily Fulgoroidea that resembles a leaf in its environment. It often hops, like a grasshopper, for transportation, but usually walks slowly to avoid detection. There are more than 12,500 planthopper species worldwide.

Citrus flatid planthopper (Metcalfa pruinosa) is native and very common in eastern North America. It has been introduced into southern Europe and is now an invasive species of concern in orchards and vineyards there. It feeds on a wide variety of woody species including maple, elm, willow, black locust, dogwood, hawthorn, elder, grape, and raspberry.

The body of citrus flatid planthopper is flattened laterally, giving it a wedge-shaped appearance when viewed from above. The wings and body are moderately to densely covered with a mealy, bluish-white, waxy powder. When at rest, the wings are tent-like, almost vertically, over the body. There are two dark spots on the basal half of each forewing.

 

Masked hunter
  masked hunter

Masked hunter (Reduvius personatus) is native to Europe and was accidentally introduced into North America. It is now common in eastern and central North America, including Minnesota, but has been reported across the continent.

Masked hunter inhabits woodlands but is often found in human homes. It eats bed bugs and other small insects, spiders, centipedes, and millipedes. It is active at night and hides during the day. If handled or trapped between clothing and skin, it can deliver a painful bite. The swelling and stinging from the bite will last up to a week.

At to in length, masked hunter is much larger than any otherwise similar assassin bugs in North America.

 
  Photo by Bill Reynolds
   
   

Pale green assassin bug
  pale green assassin bug

There are five Zelus species native to North America. Pale green assassin bug (Zelus luridus) is the most common. Due to variation in body color, this species has often been misidentified in the past as Zelus exsanguis. However, that species is very rare. With the exception of a single collected specimen, all sightings of Zelus exsanguis in the United States should probably be recorded as Zelus luridus.

Pale green assassin bug is an elongated, ½ to 11 16 long, nearly parallel-sided true bug. The overall body color is usually pale green, the color of a Granny Smith apple, but may be yellowish-green, yellow, or reddish-brown. Its beak is short and curved. When at rest it is tucked into a groove between the forelegs.

Pale green assassin bug is distinguished by its color; a spine at both rear corners of the pronotum; and a band at the end of the femur that may be dark or red and conspicuous or barely visible.

 
  Photo by Bill Reynolds
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Grape phylloxera
  grape phylloxera

Grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae) is a very small, soft-bodied, aphid-like insect. It has a complex life cycle with up to eighteen stages and four distinct forms.

Grape phylloxera is a pest of grapevines around the world. It originated in southeastern United States, where some American grape species developed resistance or tolerance to it. It was introduced into France in 1860 when infected vines were imported for their resistance to powdery mildew. In the next 40 years the pest destroyed nearly two-thirds of wine grape vineyards in Europe.

Grape phylloxera adults are difficult to identify because of their extremely small size. They are usually identified by the galls they produce on the roots and leaves of grape plants. Galls on the tips of rootlets are yellowish-brown, hook-shaped swellings. Galls of larger roots are rounded, wart-like swellings. Galls on the underside of leaves are small, green, rough, and more or less globular.

 

Western conifer seed bug
  western conifer seed bug

Western conifer seed bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis) is a common and widespread true bug. The “western” in the common name is misleading. This insect is found from coast to coast in North America, and has been introduced and is spreading in Europe. It can be seen in spring and summer on pine, hemlock, spruce, and fir trees, but is most often encountered in the fall, when it seeks shelter for the winter in human dwellings. Like stink bugs it squirts a foul-smelling chemical from the side of its body when handled.

Western conifer seed bug is distinguished by exposed, striped sides of the abdomen; and fourth leg segments that are lance-shaped, unscalloped, equal in length, less than 70% of the length of the tibia, and the outer dilation is slightly wider than the inner.

 
  Photo by Emily
   
   
   

Other Recent Additions
   

jagged ambush bug (Phymata americana)

leaf-footed bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)

poplar leaf-base gall (Pemphigus populicaulis)

meadow plant bug (Leptopterna dolabrata)

  leaf-footed bug

 

 

 

           
Profile Photo Video      

     

a plant bug (Leptopterna ferrugata)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

citrus flatid planthopper

dog day cicada

 

 

 

 

 

 

grape phylloxera

green stink bug

jagged ambush bug (americana)

large milkweed bug

leaf-footed bug

masked hunter

meadow plant bug

meadow spittlebug

pale green assassin bug

poplar leaf-base gall

 

 

 

 

spiny assassin bug

 

 

two-marked treehopper

western conifer seed bug

     

a psyllid gall on Juncus (Livia maculipennis)

 
     

banasa stink bug (Banasa dimiata)

 
     

birch catkin bug (Kleidocerys resedae)

 
     

black ground bug (Microporus nigrita)

 
     

brown stink bug (Euschistus servus)

 
     

cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae)

 
     

Canadian cicada (Okanagana canadensis)

 
     

caped leafhopper (Macrosteles clavatus)

 
Profile Photo Photo

citrus flatid planthopper (Metcalfa pruinosa)

 
     

dock aphid (Aphis rumicis)

 
Profile Photo Photo

dog day cicada (Neotibicen canicularis)

 
     

dusky stink bug (Euschistus tristigmus luridus)

 
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eastern boxelder bug (Boisea trivittata)

 
     

English grain aphid (Sitobion avenae)

 
     

false milkweed bug (Lygaeus turcicus)

 
     

four-humped stink bug (Brochymena quadripustulata)

 
     

four-lined plant bug (Poecilocapsus lineatus)

 
     

grain aphid (Acyrthosiphon dirhodum)

 
Profile Photo Photo

grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae)

 
     

green sharpshooter (Draeculacephala antica)

 
  Photo Photo

green stink bug (Acrosternum hilare)

 
     

hackberry nipplegall maker (Pachypsylla celtidismamma)

 
     

helmeted squash bug (Euthochtha galeator)

 
     

hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae)

 
     

hill prairie shovelhead leafhopper (Attenuipyga vanduzeei)

 
     

honeysuckle aphid (Hyadaphis tataricae)

 
Profile Photo Photo

jagged ambush bug (Phymata americana)

 
     

juniper stink bug (Banasa euchlora)

 
  Photo Photo

large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus)

 
Profile Photo Photo

leaf-footed bug (Acanthocephala terminalis)

 
     

lettuce root aphid (Pemphigus bursarius)

 
     

Linne’s cicada (Neotibicen linnei)

 
     

lupine bug (Megalotomus quinquespinosus)

 
Profile Photo Photo

masked hunter (Reduvius personatus)

 
Profile Photo Photo

meadow plant bug (Leptopterna dolabrata)

 
Profile Photo Photo

meadow spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius)

 
     

melon aphid (Aphis gossypii)

 
     

Nearctaphis crataegifoliae

 
Profile Photo Photo

pale green assassin bug (Zelus luridus)

 
     

pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum)

 
     

phylloxera gall of hickory (Phylloxera sp.)

 
     

pine bark adelgid (Pineus strobi)

 
Profile Photo  

poplar leaf-base gall (Pemphigus populicaulis)

 
     

poplar petiolegall aphid (Pemphigus populitransversus)

 
     

potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae)

 
     

prairie cicada (Okanagana balli)

 
     

predatory stinkbug (Podisus placidus)

 
     

red-cross shield bug (Elasmostethus cruciatus)

 
     

red-shouldered stink bug (Thyanta custator)

 
     

red-tailed leafhopper (Aflexia rubranura)

 
     

Say’s Cicada (Okanagana rimosa)

 
     

small milkweed bug (Lygaeus kalmii)

 
     

spined stilt bug (Jalysus wickhami)

 
  Photo  

spiny assassin bug (Sinea spinipes)

 
     

squash bug (Anasa tristis)

 
     

sumac gall aphid (Melaphis rhois)

 
     

turnip aphid (Lipaphis erysimi)

 
     

twice-stabbed stink bug (Cosmopepla lintneriana)

 
Profile Photo Photo

two-marked treehopper (Enchenopa binotata)

 
     

umbrose seed bug (Atrazonotus umbrosus)

 
     

Walker’s cicada (Neotibicen pronotalis)

 
     

water strider (Family Gerridae)

 
Profile Photo Photo

western conifer seed bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis)

 
     

western leaf-footed bug (Leptoglossus clypealis)

 
     

whitecrossed seed bug (Neacoryphus bicrucis)

 
     

 

 

           

 

 

No Species Page Yet?

If you do not see a linked page for an insect in the list at left, or the insect does not appear in the list, you can still upload a photo or video as an email attachment or report a sighting for that insect. Click on one of the buttons below and type in the common name and/or scientific name of the insect in your photo, video, or sighting. A new page will be created for that insect featuring your contribution.

 

 

Capitalization (or not) of Common Names

Insect scientific names are governed by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN). Vernacular (common) names are not. In an attempt to “assure the uniformity of (common) names of common insects” the Entomological Society of America (ESA) published Common Names of Insects and Related Organisms. ESA has no rule or guideline that addresses capitalization of common names. However, the database of common names published by ESA does not capitalize common names. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) also uses uncapitalized common names. Most other sources, including ITIS, BAMONA, Odonata Central, and the Peterson Field Guides, capitalize common insect names. MinnesotaSeasons.com will adhere to the convention followed by ESA and NCBI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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