Minnesota Beetles

 
Order Coleoptera

Coleoptera (beetles) is the order of insects that is characterized by having a biting mouth and two pairs of wings, the outer pair being hardened and meeting in a straight line down the back.

Coleoptera is the largest order in the animal kingdom. There are about 400,000 described species worldwide, about 24,000 species in 131 families in North America north of Mexico. The total number of species, described and undescribed, is probably close to 1,000,000. It is likely that Coleoptera will be split into two or more orders in the future.


multicolored Asian lady beetle

 

 

           

Recent Additions

 
Oil beetle
   

Oil beetle (Meloe impressus) is an infrequent, medium-sized, blister beetle. Its metallic blue body stands out in sharp relief against green foliage. It lives about one year but has a short season above ground. Adults are active for just two months between August and October. They are found on the ground or on foliage close to the ground. When threatened or mishandled, they exude an oily yellowish liquid that causes blistering on human skin.

Oil beetle larvae pass through four stages and seven molts (instars) before pupating. They live in the nests of solitary, ground-nesting bees, feeding on bee eggs, honey, and stored pollen.

Oil beetles (genus Meloe) are identified by head, body, and legs all metallic blue or black; oval-shaped abdomen; small outer wings (elytra) that overlap at the base and are much shorter than the abdomen; lack of functional inner wings; and antennae that are bent in the middle. This oil beetle (Meloe impressus) is distinguished by the usually brilliant metallic blue, violet, or green, sometimes black coloration; upper margin of the eye that is nearly straight; fifth segment of the antennae enlarged and flared outward; sparse, fine pitting on the head and thorax; thoracic plate with straight sides that converge toward the rear; and a spur on the fourth segment of the hind leg that projects toward the rear.

  oil beetle
   
   

Japanese beetle
   

Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica), native to northern Japan, was first found near Riverton, New Jersey in 1916. Two years later attempts to eradicate it by the USDA failed. It had become established — the population was too large for attempts to control it to be successful. It is now widespread across North America, reported in all of the contiguous 48 states except for Florida. It is well established from Maine to Minnesota south to Arkansas and Georgia.

Japanese beetle is a destructive pest in North America where it has no natural enemies. The larvae feed on roots of grass and other plants, causing damage to lawns, parks, golf courses, and pastures. Adults feed on leaves, flowers, and fruits of several hundred species of plants, including fruit trees, ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, field crops, and vegetable crops. They skeletonize leaves by eating the soft tissue but leaving the larger veins. They have caused 50% to 90% defoliation of birch and cottonwood trees in some neighborhoods of the Twin Cities.

Japanese beetle is a colorful, medium-sized, scarab beetle. It is identified by a metallic green head and thorax, iridescent. bronze or coppery wing covers, and white tufts of hairs at the sides and end of the abdomen.

  Japanese beetle
   
   

Spotted lady beetle

Spotted lady beetle (Coleomegilla maculata) is an elongated, pink, ladybird beetle. It is very common and widespread, probably the most common native lady beetle in eastern North America. It can be found from early spring to fall anywhere their prey are found. Almost 50% of its diet is flower pollen but it also eats aphids, adelgids, mites, insect eggs, and small insect larvae. In the fall adults congregate in large numbers to overwinter in a protected area beneath leaf litter and stones, often near crop borders.

This species is identified by the elongated body; pink background color; 12 black spots, 2 on the pronotum and 10 on the elytra; and head and femurs visible from above. There are three subspecies of spotted lady beetle. Coleomegilla maculata lengi is the most widespread and the only subspecies found in Minnesota.

  spotted lady beetle
   
   

Bronzed tiger beetle

Bronzed tiger beetle (Cicindela repanda) is one of the most common species of tiger beetle in North America. It is found in open, sunny areas with little vegetation next to a stream or river. It is active during the day but is a fast runner, difficult to catch or photograph. The larva can be seen on the ground, anchored to the mouth of its tunnel, waiting for any insect unlucky enough to pass by.

This species is identified most easily by the pale markings on its wing coverings (elytra). The crescent-shaped mark in the forward area (closest to the head) on one elytra points to the one opposite, and is connected to, or only narrowly spearated from, the mark on the margin of the middle area. Also, the vaguely S-shaped mark in the middle area is complete, not broken.

  bronzed tiger beetle
  Photo by Kirk Nelson
   
   
   
   

Maculated dung beetle

This small aphodine dung beetle is native to Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa. It was introduced into and is now common and widespread in North America. Adults are seen on cattle dung, often in large numbers, from March to May and again from August to October. Some evidence suggests that the larvae may be an agricultural pest, eating the roots of crop plants, but further study is needed to confirm this.

This species is identified by the elongated body; three projections at the tip of the antennae that can be tightly closed; variable yellow markings on the forewings; and keel-shaped ridges on the middle and hind legs.

  maculated dung beetle
  Photo by Bill Reynolds

Other Recent Additions
   

water scavenger beetle (Tropisternus sp.)

swamp milkweed leaf beetle (Labidomera clivicollis)

Minnesota longhorn beetle (Trigonarthris minnesotana)

blister beetle (Epicauta sp.)

green immigrant leaf weevil (Polydrusus formosus)

banded longhorn beetle (Typocerus velutinus)

  Minnesota longhorn beetle
  Photo by Chuck Bush
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           
Profile Photo Video      

     

a soldier beetle (Silis percomis)

 

American carrion beetle

black carpet beetle

blue-margined ground beetle

click beetle (Family Elateridae)

convergent lady beetle

end band net-winged beetle

goldenrod soldier beetle

Japanese beetle

maculated dung beetle

margined carrion beetle

multicolored Asian lady beetle

northern corn rootworm

oil beetle

Poplar’s snout weevil

red milkweed beetle

red-blue checkered beetle

seven-spotted lady beetle

spotted lady beetle

swamp milkweed leaf beetle

water scavenger beetle (Tropisternus sp.)

whirligig beetle (Gyrininae)

whitespotted sawyer

winter firefly

  Photo Photo

American carrion beetle (Necrophila americana)

 
     

Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis)

 
Profile Photo Photo

banded longhorn beetle (Typocerus velutinus)

 
     

banded net-wing beetle (Calopteron reticulatum)

 
     

big sand tiger beetle (Cicindela formosa)

 
     

black blister beetle (Epicauta pennsylvanica)

 
  Photo Photo

black carpet beetle (Attagenus unicolor)

 
     

black firefly (Lucidota atra)

 
  Photo  

blister beetle (Epicauta sp.)

 
    Photo

blue-margined ground beetle (Pasimachus elongatus)

 
Profile Photo Photo

bronzed tiger beetle (Cicindela repanda)

 
     

clay-colored leaf beetle (Anomoea laticlavia)

 
  Photo Photo

click beetle (Family Elateridae)

 
     

common eastern firefly (Photinus pyralis)

 
Profile Photo Photo

convergent lady beetle (Hippodamia convergens)

 
     

crimson saltflat tiger beetle (Cicindela fulgida fulgida)

 
     

crimson saltflat tiger beetle (Cicindela fulgida westbournei)

 
Profile Photo Photo

end band net-winged beetle (Calopteron terminale)

 
     

false Japanese beetle (Strigoderma arbicola)

 
     

fifteen-spotted lady beetle (Anatis labiculata)

 
     

firefly (Photuris sp.)

 
     

flower longhorn beetle (Strangalia luteicornis)

 
     

flower longhorn beetle (Trigonarthris proxima)

 
Profile Photo Photo

goldenrod soldier beetle (Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus)

 
  Photo Photo

green immigrant leaf weevil (Polydrusus formosus)

 
     

green june beetle (Cotinis nitida)

 
Profile Photo  

hairy flower scarab (Trichiotinus assimilis)

 
     

hairy flower scarab (Trichiotinus piger)

 
     

hairy-necked tiger beetle (Cicindela hirticollis rhodensis)

 
     

hickory bark beetle (Scolytus quadrispinosus)

 
     

horsemint tortoise beetle (Physonota unipunctata)

 
Profile Photo Photo

Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica)

 
     

Laurentian tiger beetle (Cicindela denikei)

 
     

little white tiger beetle (Cicindela lepida)

 
Profile Photo Photo

maculated dung beetle (Aphodius distinctus)

 
Profile Photo Photo

margined carrion beetle (Oiceoptoma noveboracense)

 
     

margined leatherwing (Chauliognathus marginatus)

 
Profile Photo Photo

Minnesota longhorn beetle (Trigonarthris minnesotana)

 
Profile Photo Photo

multicolored Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis f. succinea)

 
     

nine-spotted lady beetle (Coccinella novemnotata)

 
     

northern barrens tiger beetle (Cicindela patruela patruela)

 
Profile Photo Photo

northern corn rootworm beetle (Diabrotica barberi)

 
Profile Photo Photo

oil beetle (Meloe impressus)

 
    Photo

pedunculate ground beetle (Scarites quadriceps)

 
  Photo  

Pennsylvania firefly (Photuris pennsylvanica)

 
     

Pennsylvania dingy ground beetle (Harpalus pensylvanicus)

 
     

polished lady beetle (Cycloneda munda)

 
Profile Photo  

Poplar’s snout weevil (Lepyrus palustris)

 
Profile Photo Photo

red milkweed beetle (Tetraopes tetrophthalmus)

 
  Photo  

red-blue checkered beetle (Trichodes nutalli)

 
     

red-femured milkweed borer (Tetraopes femoratus)

 
     

ridged carrion beetle (Oiceoptoma inaequale)

 
     

round-necked longhorn beetle (Clytus ruricola)

 
     

sandy stream tiger beetle (Cicindela macra macra)

 
     

sandy tiger beetle (Cicindela limbata nympha)

 
Profile Photo Photo

seven-spotted lady beetle (Coccinella septempunctata)

 
     

six-spotted tiger beetle (Cicindela sexguttata)

 
     

splendid tiger beetle (Cicindela splendida cyanocephalata)

 
Profile Photo Photo

spotted lady beetle (Coleomegilla maculata)

 
  Photo Photo

striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum)

 
Profile Photo  

sumac flea beetle (Blepharida rhois)

 
     

sumac stem borer (Oberea ocellata)

 
Profile Photo Photo

swamp milkweed leaf beetle (Labidomera clivicollis)

 
     

thirteen-spotted lady beetle (Hippodamia tredecimpunctata)

 
  Photo  

toothed click beetle (Denticollis denticornis)

 
     

twelve-spotted tiger beetle (Cicindela duodecimguttata)

 
     

vivid metallic ground beetle (Chlaenius sericeus)

 
  Photo Photo

water scavenger beetle (Tropisternus sp.)

 
  Photo Photo

whirligig beetle (Subfamily Gyrininae)

 
Profile Photo Photo

whitespotted sawyer (Monochamus scutellatus scutellatus)

 
Profile Photo Photo

winter firefly (Ellychnia corrusca)

 
         

 

 

No Species Page Yet?

If you do not see a linked page for an insect in the list at left, or the insect does not appear in the list, you can still upload a photo or video as an email attachment or report a sighting for that insect. Click on one of the buttons below and type in the common name and/or scientific name of the insect in your photo, video, or sighting. A new page will be created for that insect featuring your contribution.

 

Capitalization of Common Names

Insect scientific names are governed by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN). Vernacular (common) names are not. In an attempt to “assure the uniformity of (common) names of common insects” the Entomological Society of America (ESA) published Common Names of Insects and Related Organisms. ESA has no rule or guideline that addresses capitalization of common names. However, the database of common names published by ESA does not capitalize common names. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) also uses uncapitalized common names. Most other sources, including ITIS, BAMONA, Odonata Central, and the Peterson Field Guides, capitalize common insect names. MinnesotaSeasons.com will adhere to the convention followed by ESA and NCBI.

 

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