yellow velvet beetle

(Lepturobosca chrysocoma)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

yellow velvet beetle

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Uncommon in Minnesota

Flight/Season

Summer

Habitat

Woodlands

Size

Total Length: to ¾ (10 to 20 mm)

          Photo by Luciearl
 
Identification

Yellow velvet beetle, also called golden flower longhorn beetle, is a tapered, small to medium-sized, flower longhorn beetle. It occurs in North America west of the Great Plains from Alaska to New Mexico, in southern Canada from Nova Scotia to Manitoba, and in the northern United States in Maine, northern Michigan, northern Wisconsin, and eastern Minnesota. It is uncommon in Minnesota. Larvae feed on the decaying wood of pine, spruce, alder, and aspen. Adults are found on flowers in the summer.

Adults are to ¾ (10 to 20 mm) long. The body is strongly tapered toward the rear. It is covered with long, golden-yellow hairs, though this is not visible from above.

The head is angled forward in front and is abruptly constricted in back forming a neck that is visible when viewed from above. It is mostly black except for the yellow mouth parts. The compound eyes are large, black, and deeply notched. The antennae are thread-like, slender, entirely black, and long, about as long as the body. The base of each antenna is inserted in the notch in the compound eye. All antennal segments are uniformly slender. The third segment is much longer than the first (scape), the fourth is shorter than the third, and the fifth is longer than the fourth. The neck is black. The upper part of the face (frons) and the top of the head (vertex) are moderately covered with long golden-yellow hairs that lie flat.

The upper thoracic shield (pronotum) is bell-shaped, arched, and narrow at the front. It is not as wide at the base as the base of the hardened wing covers (elytra). It is black and is covered with long, golden-yellow hairs.

The elytra are long and narrow, more than 2½ times longer than wide. They taper evenly from the broad base to the narrow tip, making the body appear broad-shouldered. They are usually yellow, sometimes with a brownish or blackish tinge. They are usually densely covered with short, yellow hairs. The hairs lie flat and are directed away from the inner margin (suture).

The legs are slender and densely covered with fine yellow hairs. The third segment (femur) of each leg is black. The fourth segment (tibia) is brownish-yellow and has a spur at the tip. The last part of each leg (tarsus), corresponding to the foot, is brownish-yellow. It has five segments but the first segment is minute, making it appear that there are only four segments. On the hind leg, the tarsi are slender. The first segment is as long as all of the remaining segments together. The third segment is split beyond the middle.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

Decaying wood of hardwoods and conifers

 
Adult Food

Flower nectar

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24, 27, 29, 30, 82, 83.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Coleoptera (beetles)

 

Suborder:

Polyphaga (water, rove, scarab, longhorn, leaf and snout beetles)

 

Infraorder:

Cucujiformia

 

Superfamily:

Chrysomeloidea (long-horned and leaf beetles)

 

Family:

Cerambycidae (long-horned beetles)

 

Subfamily:

Lepturinae (flower long-horned beetles)

 

Tribe:

Lepturini

 

Genus:

Lepturobosca

 

This species was formerly classified as Cosmosalia chrysocoma.

 
Synonyms

Cosmosalia aureola

Cosmosalia auripilis

Cosmosalia auripilis densepilosa

Cosmosalia chrysocoma

 
Common
Names

golden flower longhorn beetle

yellow velvet beetle

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Elytra

The hardened forewings on an insect used to protect the fragile hindwings, which are used for flying, in beetles and true bugs. Singular: elytrum.

 

Femur

On insects and arachnids, the third, largest, most robust segment of the leg, coming immediately before the tibia. On humans, the thigh bone.

 

Frons

The upper part of an insect’s face, roughly corresponding to the forehead.

 

Pronotum

The saddle-shaped, exoskeletal plate on the upper side of the first segment of the thorax of an insect.

 

Scape

On plants: An erect, leafless stalk growing from the rootstock and supporting a flower or a flower cluster. On insects: The basal segment of the antenna.

 

Tarsus

On insects, the last two to five subdivisions of the leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. On spiders, the last segment of the leg. Plural: tarsi.

 

Tibia

The fourth segment of an insect leg, after the femur and before the tarsus (foot). The fifth segment of a spider leg or palp.

 

Vertex

The upper surface of an insect’s head.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Luciearl
       

This beetle spent a couple of days on the same yarrow.

  yellow velvet beetle    
       
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Luciearl
6/24/2020

Location: Cass County

This beetle spent a couple of days on the same yarrow.

yellow velvet beetle


     
     
 
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Created: 9/16/2020

Last Updated:

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