winter firefly

(Ellychnia corrusca)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

winter firefly

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common

Flight/Season

May to late September

Habitat

Moist, marshy areas

Size

Total Length: to 9 16

         
          Photo by Bill Reynolds

Identification

This is a medium-sized, to 9 16 long, diurnal firefly.

The thoracic shield (pronotum) is semi-elliptical. It does not have translucent windows. It is pale with a broad black stripe in the middle and a narrow black stripe on the left and right margins. The pale area between the stripes is usually mostly pale rose colored. From above the pronotum appears black with pale rose “parentheses” markings.

The forewings (elytra) are black without pale borders or stripes. They have minute, brownish-gray hairs that give them a dusty appearance.

The head is concealed beneath the pronotum. The antennae are thread-like and black. They are not flattened. The third antennal segment is shorter than the first.

The legs are black. The end segment of each leg (tarsus) has 5 sections.

There are no bioluminescent organs.

 
Similar
Species

Other Ellychnia species are smaller, 316 to 5 16long, and do not have pale hairs on the elytra.


Larval Food

Rotting wood

 
Adult Food

Maple tree sap and flower nectar in the spring, and possibly goldenrod and aster flower nectar in the autumn.

 
Life Cycle

Adults overwinter in a crevice of tree bark. They emerge and become active in March. Breeding occurs in April and May. Eggs hatch in about 16 days. Adults of the previous season die in late spring. The larvae feed on rotting wood and pupate in the fall. Adults of the new season emerge before snowfall.

 
Behavior

Adults are active during the day. They do not possess bioluminescent organs and therefore do not light up.

Overwintering adults may become active on warm, sunny, winter days, moving a short distance from their wintering spot.


Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24.


Comments

Taxonomy
Research in 2003 suggests that Ellychnia corrusca may be a species complex, meaning that collected specimens of this species should be reclassified as several new species.


Taxonomy

Order:

Coleoptera (beetles)

 

Suborder:

Polyphaga (water, rove, scarab, longhorn, leaf and snout beetles)

 

Infraorder:

Elateriformia

 

Superfamily:

Elateroidea (click beetles, fireflies and soldier beetles)

 

Family:

Lampyridae (fireflies)

 

Subfamily:

Lampyrinae

 

Tribe:

Photinini

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

diurnal firefly

winter firefly


 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

elytra

The hardened forewings on an insect used to protect the fragile hindwings, which are used for flying, in beetles and true bugs.

 

pronotum

The saddle-shaped, exoskeletal plate on the upper side of the first segment of the thorax of an insect.

 

tarsus

The last two to five sections of an insect’s leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. Plural: tarsi.

 

 

 

 

 

       

Visitor Photos

   
Share your photo of this insect.

Bill Reynolds


Found these fireflies hanging out on one of my bee hives.

  winter firefly   winter firefly
       
  winter firefly    

       
       
       

MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos

   
       
       

 

Camera

     

Slideshows

   
  Winter Firefly (Ellychnia corrusca)
Andree Reno Sanborn
 
  Winter Firefly (Ellychnia corrusca)  
     
  Winter Firefly (Ellychnia corrusca)
Bill Keim
 
  Winter Firefly (Ellychnia corrusca)  

 

slideshow

     

Visitor Videos

   
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Other Videos

 
  Ellychnia Fireflies (Lampyridae: Ellychnia corrusca) Mating
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jun 17, 2011

This is one of our most common diurnally-active fireflies (i.e., fireflies which do not possess abdominal light organs in the adult stage of their life cycle). Photographed at Fisher, Minnesota (17 June 2011).

 
     
  Diurnal Firefly (Lampyridae: Ellychnia corrusca) Mating
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on May 19, 2010

Photographed at Rydell NWR, Minnesota (18 May 2010). Go here to read more about this species: http://bugguide.net/node/view/42641

 
     
  Diurnal Firefly (Lampyridae: Ellychnia corrusca) Taking Flight
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on May 27, 2010

Photographed at the Rydell NWR, Minnesota (27 May 2010). Go here to read more about this species: http://bugguide.net/node/view/42641

 
     
  Diurnal Firefly (Lampyridae: Ellychnia corrusca) on Wall
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on May 24, 2011

Photographed at Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (24 May 2011). Thank you to 'v belov' (@Bugguide.net) for confirming the identity ofn this specimen!

 
     
  Diurnal Firefly (Lampyridae: Ellychnia corrusca) on Oak Bark
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Apr 23, 2011

Photographed at the Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (23 April 2011).

 
     

 

Camcorder

         

Visitor Sightings

   
Share your sighting of this insect.

Bill Reynolds
9/20/2014

Location: Pennington Co MN

Found these fireflies hanging out on one of my bee hives.

winter firefly


     
     
 

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