reddish-brown stag beetle

(Lucanus capreolus)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

reddish-brown stag beetle

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common

Flight/Season

 

    Photo by Plannine
Habitat

Deciduous forests, parks, neighborhoods with trees, around decaying logs and stumps.

Size

Total Length: ¾ to 1716 (20 to 36 mm)

 
 
Identification

Reddish-brown stag beetle is relatively large beetle. It occurs in the United States east of the Great Plains and in adjacent Canadian provinces. It is found around decaying logs and stumps in deciduous forests, parks, and neighborhoods with trees. Larvae feed on decaying wood, adults feed on tree sap. The name “stag beetle” refers to the oversized mandibles on some males that resemble deer antlers. Another common name for this beetle is pinching bug. The mandibles look fierce and are used to fight other males over a female. When confronted, it will rear back threateningly with its mandibles open. However, when handled by humans, it can give no more than a mild pinch.

Adults are light to dark reddish-brown and ¾ to 1716 (20 to 36 mm) in length not including the mandibles. The body is robust and elongated.

The head and mouthparts are directed forward. The head is large and is not concealed beneath the pronotum. On the male it is slightly wider than the exoskeletal plate covering the thorax (pronotum). The antennae have 10 segments (antenomeres) including the very long basal segment (scape). They are abruptly bent, elbow-like (geniculate), after the scape. The last four segments are expanded sideways, comb-like, into long flattened lobes (clubbed). The clubbed segments cannot be held together. The chewing mouthparts (mandibles) are enlarged and curved inwards. They are not branched. On major males they are greatly elongated, as long as the pronotum. On females and minor males they are shorter. On both sexes the mandibles have just a single inward-pointing tooth.

The pronotum is narrower than the base of the hardened wing covers (elytra). It does not have any grooves, ridges, or projections.

They elytra are not grooved or ridged. They appear smooth but are densely covered with very fine punctures.

The legs are are mostly reddish-brown and are adapted for digging. The third segment of each leg (femur) is yellowish-brown, distinctly lighter than the body and the remaining leg segments. The fourth segment (tibia) of the front leg has distinct, saw-like, large and small teeth. The last part of the leg (tarsus), corresponding to the foot, has five segments. There is a pair of claws at the end of the last segment. The claws are equal in size and are not toothed.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

Decaying wood

 
Adult Food

Tree sap

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

Adults are active at night and are attracted to lights. They make a loud buzzing noise when they fly.

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24, 27, 29, 30, 82.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Coleoptera (beetles)

 

Suborder:

Polyphosphate (water, rove, scarab, longhorn, leaf and snout beetles)

 

Infraorder:

Scarabaeiformia

 

Superfamily:

Scarabaeoidea (scarab, stag and bess beetles)

 

Family:

Lucanidae (stag beetles)

 

Subfamily:

Lucaninae

 

Tribe:

Lucanini

 

Genus:

Lucanus

 
Synonyms

Lucanus dama

Lucanus muticus

Lucanus trigonus

Pseudolucanus capreolus

 
Common
Names

pinching bug

reddish-brown stag beetle

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Elytra

The hardened forewings on an insect used to protect the fragile hindwings, which are used for flying, in beetles and true bugs.

 

Femur

On insects and arachnids, the third, largest, most robust segment of the leg, coming immediately before the tibia. On humans, the thigh bone.

 

Pronotum

The saddle-shaped, exoskeletal plate on the upper side of the first segment of the thorax of an insect.

 

Punctate

Dotted with pits (punctures), transluscent sunken glands, or colored spots of pigment.

 

Scape

On plants: An erect, leafless stalk growing from the rootstock and supporting a flower or a flower cluster. On insects: The basal segment of the antenna.

 

Tarsus

On insects, the last two to five subdivisions of the leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. On spiders, the last segment of the leg. Plural: tarsi.

 

Tibia

The fourth segment of an insect leg, after the femur and before the tarsus (foot). The fifth segment of a spider leg or palp.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Plannine
       

Found this guy knocking on my front door on the evening of June 9th.

  reddish-brown stag beetle    
       
       
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Other Videos
 
  Lucanus capreolus
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Slow motion stag beetle

   
       
  lucanus capreolus enjoying some maple syrup 😁
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About

Jul 11, 2019

   
       
  Reddish-brown Stag Beetle (Female) - Lucanus capreolus
adamitshelanu
 
   
 
About

Aug 28, 2015

Reddish-brown Stag Beetle (Female) - Lucanus capreolus

   
       
  Adult female Lucanus elaphus or Lucanus capreolus
Nathaniel Long
 
   
 
About

Jul 21, 201

   
       

 

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Plannine
6/9/2020

Location: Elk River - Sherburne County

Found this guy knocking on my front door on the evening of June 9th.

reddish-brown stag beetle


     
     
 
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Created: 8/18/2020

Last Updated:

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