fifteen-spotted lady beetle

(Anatis labiculata)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

fifteen-spotted lady beetle

 

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

 

Flight/Season

April to July

Habitat

Forests and woodlands

Size

Total Length: ¼ to (7.2 to 9.5 mm)

         
         
         
         
          Photo by Alfredo Colon
 
Identification

Fifteen-spotted lady beetle is a large “giant lady beetle.” It occurs in North America east of the Great Plains. It is most common in the United States from Maine to Minnesota in the north to Virginia and Missouri in the south.

The body is almost round, very convex, ¼ to (7.2 to 9.5 mm) long, and 3 16 to 5 16 (5.5 to 8.0 mm) wide.

The head is shallowly inserted into the thorax, but is visible from above.

The upper thoracic plate (pronotum) is convex and wider than long. It is white with a large black spot in the center and a small black spot on each lateral margin. The central black spot has two white spots at the base and looks vaguely like a W or M, depending on if it is viewed from the front (W) or from behind (M).

The thick, hardened, shell-like forewings (elytra) are strongly convex and very narrowly flattened at the margins. They completely cover the abdomen. The background color is variable but the pattern is not. They may be gray, yellowish-orange, or dark brownish-red, but they always have fifteen black spots. Each elytron has eight spots in a 2-3-3 pattern. The spot in the middle at the base merges with one on the opposite elytron and is counted as a single spot, giving a total count of fifteen. The spots are never ringed with white or yellow. As the beetle ages, the elytra become darker. Older individuals are very dark reddish-brown to almost black, making the spot pattern difficult to see.

The legs are yellowish-brown. The fourth segment (tibia) on the middle and hind legs have two spurs at the tip. The last part of each leg (tarsus), corresponding to the foot, has four segments, but the third segment is very short and tucked within the extended lobes of the second segment, making the leg appear to have only three segments. The tip of the last tarsal segment on the middle and hind legs has a pair of claws. Each claw has a large tooth at the base.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

 

 
Adult Food

Aphids on coniferous and deciduous trees

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24, 27, 29, 30.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Coleoptera (beetles)

 

Suborder:

Polyphaga (water, rove, scarab, longhorn, leaf and snout beetles)

 

Infraorder:

Cucujiformia

 

Superfamily:

Cucujoidea

 

Family:

Coccinellidae (ladybird beetles)

 

Subfamily:

Coccinellinae

 

Tribe:

Coccinellini

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

fifteen-spotted lady beetle

fifteen-spotted ladybird beetle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Elytra

The hardened forewings on an insect used to protect the fragile hindwings, which are used for flying, in beetles and true bugs. Singular: elytrum.

 

Pronotum

The saddle-shaped, exoskeletal plate on the upper side of the first segment of the thorax of an insect.

 

Tarsus

The last two to five subdivisions of an insect’s leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. Plural: tarsi.

 

Tibia

The fourth segment of an insect leg, after the femur and before the tarsus (foot).

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Alfredo Colon
       
  fifteen-spotted lady beetle   fifteen-spotted lady beetle
       
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Other Videos
 
  Fifteen-spotted Lady Beetle (Coccinellidae: Anatis labiculata) Close-up
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Published on Jun 24, 2010

This specimen has emerged from the pupa stage within the last day, and is nestled here against the carcass of a dead Tent Caterpillar (Lasiocampidae). Photographed at Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (24 June 2010).

   
       
  Fifteen-spotted Lady Beetle (Coccinellidae: Anatis labiculata) on the Move
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Published on Jun 6, 2011

Photographed at Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (06 June 2011).

   
       
  Fifteen-spotted Lady Beetle (Coccinellidae: Anatis labiculata)
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Published on Jun 12, 2010

I understand that the elytra darken with age, and so this must be a very aged specimen. Photographed at Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (11 June 2010).

   
       

 

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Alfredo Colon
8/20/2018

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

fifteen-spotted lady beetle


     
     
 
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