birch catkin bug

(Kleidocerys resedae)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

birch catkin bug

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

 

Flight/Season

One generation per year (in Ontario)

Habitat/Hosts

Birch

Size

Total Length: to 316 (4.5 to 5.5 mm)

    Photo by Alfredo Colon
 
Identification

Birch catkin bug is a small seed bug. It occurs in Europe, eastern Asia, and North America. Based on the number of reported sightings, it is relatively uncommon in Minnesota. However, it is probably under-reported due to its small size.

Adults are to 316 (4.5 to 5.5 mm) long, reddish-brown, and fairly hard-bodied.

The head is longer than wide, projected forward, and densely covered with small punctures (punctate). The beak-like part of the head containing the mouth parts (rostrum) has four segments. It is short, slender, and projects downward and forward when sucking plant juices. It is tucked into a groove on the underside of the thorax when not in use. The antennae are much longer than the head but much shorter than the body. They have four segments beyond the short basal segment (scape). They are widened at the tip (clubbed). The first and fourth segments are darker than the second and third. There are two large compound eyes on the sides of the head and two small simple eyes (ocelli) on the top of the head.

The exoskeletal plate covering the thorax (pronotum) is densely punctate.

There are two pairs of wings, and they are held flat over the body when at rest. The front wings (hemelytra) are longer than the hind wings and much longer than the body. The exoskeletal plate between the wing bases (scutellum), is large, triangular and reddish-brown at the tip. The hemelytra have a thickened part at the base and a thin, membranous, mostly transparent part at the tip, with a clear dividing line between the two. The thickened part is comprised of narrow area (clavus) behind the scutellum when the wings are closed and the broad marginal area (corium). At the end of the corium there is a small but distinct triangular area (cuneus). The scutellum is large and triangular. It is . The clavus has three rows of punctures. The corium is clear or yellowish and has several dark spots.

The legs are mostly reddish-brown. The last part of the leg (tarsus), corresponding to the foot, is brownish-black and has 3 segments. The last tarsal segment has a claw at the tip. There is a pad at the base of each claw.

Nymphs look like wingless adults.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

Seeds of birch trees and shrubs

 
Adult Food

 

 
Life Cycle

Adults overwinter within birch catkins in leaf litter on the ground. They emerge in early spring and lay eggs in June.

 
Behavior

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24, 27, 29, 30, 82.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Hemiptera (true bugs, cicadas, hoppers, aphids and allies)

 

No Rank:

Euhemiptera

 

No Rank:

Neohemiptera

 

No Rank:

Prosorrhyncha

 

Suborder:

Heteroptera (true bugs)

 

No Rank:

Euheteroptera

 

No Rank:

Neoheteroptera

 

No Rank:

Panheteroptera

 

Infraorder:

Pentatomomorpha

 

Superfamily:

Lygaeoidea

 

Family:

Lygaeidae (seed bugs)

 

Family:

Lygaeidae

 

Subfamily:

Ischnorhynchinae

 

Genus:

Kleidocerys

 
Subordinate Taxa

birch catkin bug (Kleidocerys resedae fuscomaculatus)

birch catkin bug (Kleidocerys resedae geminatus) ?

birch catkin bug (Kleidocerys resedae resedae) ?

 
Synonyms

Lygaeus resedae

 
Common
Names

birch catkin bug

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Corium

The thickened basal portion of the front wing that lies between the clavus and the membrane of insects in the family Hemiptera.

 

Cuneus

The triangular, hardened, horn-like tip of the forewing of a plant bug (family Miridae).

 

Hemelytron

The forewing of true bugs (Order Hemiptera), thickened at the base and membranous at the tip. Plural: hemelytra.

 

Ocellus

Simple eye; an eye with a single lens. Plural: ocelli.

 

Pronotum

The saddle-shaped, exoskeletal plate on the upper side of the first segment of the thorax of an insect.

 

Punctate

Dotted with pits (punctures), transluscent sunken glands, or colored spots of pigment.

 

Rostrum

The stiff, beak-like projection of the carapace or prolongation of the head of an insect, crustacean, or cetacean.

 

Scutellum

The exoskeletal plate covering the rearward (posterior) part of the middle segment of the thorax in some insects. In Coleoptera, Hemiptera, and Homoptera, the dorsal, often triangular plate behind the pronotum and between the bases of the front wings. In Diptera, the exoskeletal plate between the abdomen and the thorax.

 

Tarsus

The last two to five subdivisions of an insect’s leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. Plural: tarsi.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Alfredo Colon
       
  birch catkin bug    
       
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
   
       
       
       

 

Camera

     
Slideshows
   
  Birch Catkin Bug (Kleidocerys resedae) (O)
Bill Keim
 
  Birch Catkin Bug (Kleidocerys resedae) (O)  
     

 

slideshow

       
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Other Videos
 
  Kleidocerys resedae - Birch Catkin Bug
Maria Hellström
 
   
 
About

Jun 1, 2016

   
       

 

Camcorder

         
Visitor Sightings
   
Report a sighting of this insect.
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Alfredo Colon
8/19/2019

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

birch catkin bug


     
     
 
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Created: 2/17/2020

Last Updated:

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