oleander aphid

(Aphis nerii)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

oleander aphid

NatureServe

not listed

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common

Flight/Season

June to October

Habitat/Hosts

Fields and gardens. Milkweeds and occasionally other plants.

Size

Total Length: 116to (1.5 to 2.6 mm)

Photo by Alfredo Colon
 
Identification

Oleander aphid is a small, common, and widespread aphid. It occurs on every continent except Greenland and Antarctica. It is common in Minnesota. It is found in fields and gardens from June to October. In Minnesota it feeds mostly on milkweeds but occasionally on other plants. When feeding on milkweeds it sequesters cardiac glycosides, which makes it distasteful or even poisonous to predators. Females do not lay eggs but give birth to live female larvae. This allows large colonies to develop rapidly. Males do not occur in the wild.

Adults are orangish-yellow, somewhat pear-shaped, and 116to (1.5 to 2.6 mm) long not including the wings when present. They are usually wingless. Winged (alate) adults occur only in conditions of overcrowding or when the host plant is deteriorating with age (senescing). There is a pair of elongated processes (cornicles) near the end of the abdomen. The antennae, cornicles, legs, and tip of the abdomen are black. On winged females, the top of the head, and the upper side of the thorax are also black. The wings have dark veins and are much longer than the body.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

 

 
Adult Food

Plant juices

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24, 29, 30, 82, 83.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Hemiptera (true bugs, cicadas, hoppers, aphids and allies)

 

No Rank:

Sternorrhyncha

 

No Rank:

Aphidiformes

 

No Rank:

Aphidomorpha (aphids)

 

No Rank:

Aphidomorpha (aphids)

 

Superfamily:

Aphidoidea

 

Family:

Aphididae (aphids)

 

Subfamily:

Aphidinae

 

Tribe:

Aphidini

 

Subtribe:

Aphidina

 

Genus:

Aphis

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

milkweed aphid

oleander aphid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Alfredo Colon
       
  oleander aphid   oleander aphid
       
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slideshow

       
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Other Videos
 
  Milkweed Aphid Nature Walks with Mark Fraser
nwwmark
 
   
 
About

Aug 8, 2009

The breathtaking "Milkweed Aphid" represents one of the most stunning examples of symbiosis in the natural world. Symbiosis is when different species have a mutual relationship that is actually beneficial to each. These aphids are like miniature cows, grazing on the green of the Milkweed seed pods and leaves. They behave no different then a milking cow would do in its own pasture grazing and raising their young. Just like a cow, there is a farmer, that actually "milks" the aphids! Watching this reminds us just how truly connected to the natural world all of us really are. It's as if you were flying over a farmers field and watching the daily goings on. A truly remarkable species!

I'm Mark Fraser you can find me at http://www.naturewalkswithmark.org, lets enjoy and admire the amazing Milkweed aphids!

Did you know?

Milkweed Aphids produce food for the ants so the ants will protect them

Ants will defend the Aphids from any insect who is trying to eat them

There are tiny predators of aphids that "look like them" to fool the farmers

   
       
  Aphis Nerii
Lee Lewis
 
   
 
About

Aug 14, 2008

This is probably the most STUPID video I ever made, but here it is anyway. I was fascinated by the bright yellow aphids in my yard. I learned they are "Aphis Nerii" or "Milkweed Aphid" ... or "Oleander Aphid." The one clip of the winged female made me think of Darth Vader and the Imperial March. And this is the result!

   
       
  Aphis nerii (Milkweed Aphid) on Narrowleaf Milkweed stem
msbrunell
 
   
 
About

Jul 16, 2020

These aphids are infesting my milkweed plants. Here are some close-ups shots.

   
       

 

Camcorder

         
Visitor Sightings
   
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Alfredo Colon
8/3/2019

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

oleander aphid


Alfredo Colon
8/2/2019

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

oleander aphid


     
     
 
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Created: 9/18/2020

Last Updated:

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