black-sided meadow katydid

(Conocephalus nigropleurum)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

black-sided meadow katydid

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

 

Flight/Season

 

Habitat

Wet meadows, marshy areas

Size

Total Length: Less than 1

         
         
         
         
          Photo by Alfredo Colon
 
Identification

Black-sided meadow katydid is a small, easily recognized, lesser meadow katydid. It occurs in northern United States from Vermont to South Dakota south to Ohio and Kansas, and in Quebec and Ontario, Canada. It is found in wet marshy areas.

Adults are slender and less than 1 long. Their striking coloration is unique among North American katydids.

The top of the head (vertex) is yellowish-brown with a black longitudinal line in the middle. The face and the sides of the head below the compound eyes (genae) are dark brown. The eyes are black and somewhat protruding. The antennae are slender and long, much longer than the body. There is a rounded projection between the antennae bases that does not project beyond the first antenna segment.

The exoskeletal plate covering the thorax (pronotum) is mostly dark brown. The margins of each side (lateral lobe) of the pronotum are bright green. There are two small spines on the underside of the thorax.

The abdomen is shiny black. Occasionally it is black on the sides and very dark brown above, especially on females. On the male, the sensory appendages (cerci) at the end of the abdomen are bright green. On the female, the egg-laying appendage (ovipositor) is blade-like, sharply pointed, slender, straight, and long, about as long as the abdomen.

The forewings (tegmina) are leathery, bright green, translucent and short. They do not extend to the end of the abdomen.

The legs are bright green. The greatly enlarged third segment (femur) of the hind leg has one or more spines on the underside. The fourth segment (tibia) of the hind leg has three pairs of spurs. The last part of the leg (tarsus), corresponding to the foot, has four segments.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Nymph Food

 

 
Adult Food

 

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 24, 27, 29, 30.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets, katydids)

 

Suborder:

Ensifera (long-horned Orthoptera)

 

Infraorder:

Tettigoniidea (katydids, camel crickets, and relatives)

 

Superfamily:

Tettigonioidea

 

Family:

Tettigoniidae (katydids)

 

Subfamily:

Conocephalinae (coneheads and meadow katydids)

 

Tribe:

Conocephalini (meadow katydids)

 

Genus:

Conocephalus (lesser meadow katydids)

 
Synonyms

Conocephalus nigropleuroides

 
Common
Names

black-sided meadow katydid

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Cercus

One of a pair of small sensory appendages at the end of the abdomen of many insects and other arthropods. In Odonata, one of the upper pair of claspers. Plural: cerci.

 

Femur

On insects and arachnids, the third, largest, most robust segment of the leg, coming immediately before the tibia. On humans, the thigh bone.

 

Gena

In insects, the area below the compound eye. In birds, the feathered side (outside) of the under mandible; the area between the the angle of the jaw and the bill.

 

Ovipositor

A long needle-like tube on the abdomens of some female insects, used to inject eggs into soil or plant stems.

 

Tarsus

On insects, the last two to five subdivisions of the leg, attached to the tibia; the foot. On spiders, the last segment of the leg. Plural: tarsi.

 

Tegmen

The modified, leathery front wing of grasshoppers and related insects that protects the hindwing. It may also serve as a camouflage, a defensive display, or a sound board. Plural: tegmina.

 

Tibia

The fourth segment of an insect leg, after the femur and before the tarsus (foot). The fifth segment of a spider leg or palp.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Alfredo Colon
       
  black-sided meadow katydid   black-sided meadow katydid
       
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Other Videos
 
  Black-sided Meadow Katydid (Tettigoniidae: Conocephalus nigropleurum) Nymph on Post
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Jul 23, 2009

Photographed at the Kellys Slough NWR, North Dakota (23 July 2009). Thank you to David Ferguson(@Bugguide.net) for helping me to identify this specimen.

   
       
  Black-sided Meadow Katydid (Tettigoniidae: Conocephalus nigropleurum) on Blossom
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Aug 19, 2010

Photographed at the Kellys Slough NWR, North Dakota (19 August 2010).

   
       
  Black-sided Meadow Katydid (Tettigoniidae: Conocephalus nigropleurum) Eating
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Sep 5, 2010

Photographed at Kellys Slough NWR, North Dakota (05 September 2010). Go here to view other images of this species: http://bugguide.net/node/view/25883

   
       
  Black-sided Meadow Katydid (Tettigoniidae: Conocephalus nigropleurum) Female on Blossom
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Sep 8, 2009

Photographed at Grand Forks, North Dakota (07 September 2009). Thank you to David Ferguson(@Bugguide.net) for helping me to identify this species.

   
       

 

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Alfredo Colon
8/14/2019

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

black-sided meadow katydid


 
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Created: 2/8/2020

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