blackberry looper

(Chlorochlamys chloroleucaria)

               
Hodges #

7071

blackberry looper

 

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Widespread and very common in Minnesota

Flight/Season

Two generations per year: May to September

Habitat

Woodlands, fields, and other open areas

Size

Wingspan: 9 16 to (14 to 23 mm)

Photo by Alfredo Colon
 
Identification

Blackberry looper is a small, widespread, and very common emerald moth. It occurs in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, in adjacent Canadian provinces, and in Mexico. It is very common in Minnesota. It is found in woodlands, fields, and other open areas. There are two generations each year. Adults fly from May to September and mature caterpillars are found from May through fall.

Adult blackberry looper moths have a wingspan of 9 16 to (14 to 23 mm). There is a wide longitudinal stripe on the upper (dorsal) side of the thorax extending to the tip of the abdomen. The wings are relatively large and grayish-green with creamy white lines and with minute, creamy white speckling that gives them a grainy appearance. The forewing has wide antemedial (AM) and postmedial (PM) lines, a wide band on the leading (costal) margin, and sometimes a thin line on the outer margin (terminal line). The fringe is creamy white. The hindwing is similar but with only a PM line. As the adult ages the green fades and the wings become more cream colored. The antennae on the male are broadly feather-like with extensions along both sides of the shaft (bipectinate). On the female the antennae are thread-like.

The caterpillar is less than 1 (2.5 cm) long. The body is pale green with minute whitish speckling. The head is brownish. There are pale, slender horns on the head and first thoracic segment that project forward. There is a pale longitudinal stripe in the middle (middorsal stripe) and on each side there is one thin pale stripe in the subdorsal area, one above the breathing pores (spiracles), one through the spiracles, and one below the spiracles. There is also a yellow band between each abdominal segment. Mature caterpillars are active from May to fall.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

Blackberry, raspberry, and strawberry fruits, and the flower petals of goldenrods and many other plants in the Aster (Asteraceae) family.

 
Adult Food

 

 
Life Cycle

 

 
Behavior

Adults are active both day and night. They sometimes come to lights but in small numbers.

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 21, 24, 27, 29, 30, 71, 75.

 
Comments

 

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)

 

Suborder:

Glossata

 

Infraorder:

Neolepidoptera

 

Parvorder:

Heteroneura

 

No Rank:

Ditrysia

 

No Rank:

Obtectomera

 

Superfamily:

Geometroidea (inchworm moths)

 

Family:

Geometridae (geometer moths)

 

Subfamily:

Geometrinae (emeralds)

 

Tribe:

Hemitheini

 
Synonyms

Aplodes flavilineata

Eucrostis rectilinea

Geometra desolataria

Nemoria chloroleucaria

 

Nemoria densaria

Nemoria indiscriminata

Thassodes deprivata

 
Common
Names

blackberry looper

blackberry looper moth

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Antemedial line

A thin line separating the basal area and the median area of the forewing of Lepidoptera.

 

Costal margin

The leading edge of the forewing of insects.

 

Spiracle

A small opening on the surface of an insect through which the insect breathes.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Alfredo Colon
       
  blackberry looper   blackberry looper
       
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
   
       
       

 

Camera

     
Slideshows
   
  Blackberry Looper (Chlorochlamys chloroleucaria)
Bill Keim
 
  Blackberry Looper (Chlorochlamys chloroleucaria)  
     
  Blackberry Looper - Hodges#7071 (Chlorochlamys chloroleucaria)
Andree Reno Sanborn
 
  Blackberry Looper - Hodges#7071 (Chlorochlamys chloroleucaria)  
     

 

slideshow

       
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Other Videos
 
  Blackberry Looper Moth (Geometridae: Chlorochamys chloroleucaria) Dorsal View
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Aug 16, 2011

Photographed at the Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (16 August 2011). Thank you to Maury Heiman (@Bugguide.net) for identifying this specimen!

   
       

 

Camcorder

         
Visitor Sightings
   
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Alfredo Colon
Summer 2018

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

blackberry looper


     
     
 
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Created: 11/23/2019

Last Updated:

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