dogwood borer

(Synanthedon scitula)

               
Hodges #

2549

dogwood borer

 

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Uncommon

Flight/Season

Probably just one generation per year: May to September in Minnesota

Habitat

Deciduous woods, parks, yards

Photo by Alfredo Colon
Size

Total Length: 5 16 to ½

Wingspan: 9 16 to ¾

 

Identification

Dogwood borer is a small clearwing moth. It occurs in southeast Canada and in the United States east of the Mississippi River. It is less common in Minnesota where it is at the western edge of its range. It is a major pest of pecan and flowering dogwood.

Adults look convincingly like a wasp. They are 5 16 to ½ long and have a wingspan of 9 16 to ¾. They are mostly black or metallic bluish-black with yellow markings.

The thorax is dark with a yellow longitudinal line on each side. The abdomen is dark with a thin yellow band on the second segment and a thicker one on the fourth segment. On the female, the band on the fourth segment is much thicker. A rounded tuft of long hairs (anal tuft) flares outward from the last abdominal segment. The anal tuft is mostly black with a few to many yellow hairs on both lateral margins and sometimes also in the middle.

The forewings are 3 16 to long, narrow, and rounded at the tip. They are longer and much narrower than the hindwings. They are mostly free of scales (clear) with a black border, a black bar through the discal area, a yellow patch near the tip, and dark scales along the veins. The leading (costal) margin is black with narrow yellow streaks. The hindwing is entirely clear except for dark scales along the veins. It has a dark fringe of short hairs. As with most moths, the hindwings and forewings are held in contact by bristles (a frenulum) and scales (a retinaculum). Unlike most moths, they are also held together by a rolled under inner margin of the forewing coupling with a rolled up costal margin of the hindwing.

 
Similar
Species

 


Larval Food

A wide variety of deciduous trees, including dogwood, black cherry, American plum, Canadian plum, pecan, hickory, oak, beech, birch, elm, mountain-ash, viburnum, willow, apple, blueberry, pine, willow, hazel, and ninebark.

 
Adult Food

 

 
Life Cycle

The female lays single pale yellow eggs in the wound of a tree. She lays up to 100 or more eggs throughout the year. When an egg hatches in eight or nine days, the larva burrows under the bark. The larva will pass through seven stages (instars). In the fall it creates a cocoon-like shelter (hibernaculum) within the feeding gallery and overwinters. It resumes feeding in the spring, spins a cocoon, and emerges as an adult about 25 days later.

 
Behavior

Adults are active during the day.


Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 21, 24, 30, 75.


Comments

 


Taxonomy

Order:

Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)

 

Suborder:

Glossata

 

Infraorder:

Neolepidoptera

 

Parvorder:

Heteroneura

 

No Rank:

Ditrysia

 

No Rank:

Apoditrysia

 

Superfamily:

Sesioidea

 

Family:

Sesiidae (clear-winged moths)

 

Subfamily:

Sesiinae

 

Tribe:

Synanthedonini

 
Synonyms

Aegeria scitula

Sesia scitula

Trichilium scitula

 
Common
Names

dogwood borer

dogwood borer moth

pecan borer

pecan clearwing moth


 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Costal margin

The leading edge of the forewing of insects.

 

Frenulum

A spine (male) or multiple spines (female) at the base of the costal edge of the hindwing of many moths that couples with the retinaculum on the forewing to keep the wings in contact which each other.

 

Instar

The developmental stage of arthropods between each molt; in insects, the developmental stage of the larvae or nymph.

 

 

 

 

 

       

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Alfredo Colon


  dogwood borer   dogwood borer

       
       
       

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  DOGWOOD BORER
Insect Identification
 
  DOGWOOD BORER  
 
About

LATIN NAME: Synanthedon scitula (Harris)

LIFE CYCLE: Larvae overwinter under bark in burr knots, around cankers and damaged bark. They pupate in late spring and adults are present from early June to September, peaking in mid-July. Eggs are laid on burr knots, bark wounds and cankers. Larvae are found throughout the year. There is one generation per year.

MONITORING: Set out pheromone traps by mid-June to monitor adult moths. Also examine tree base for reddish-brown frass (droppings) expelled by larvae and partially extended pupal cases.

HOSTS: Apple, plum, oak, flowering dogwoods, mountain ash, birch, willow and elm.

COMMENTS: Closely examine captured moths as related species may also be captured (e.g., apple clearwing, peach tree borer, rhododendron borer, lilac borer). Larvae of the American plum borer as well as apple clearwing moth may be present together in hosts common to all species.

BODY LENGTH: Adult wingspan - 18-22 mm; Mature larva - 15-17 mm.

 
     

 

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  Candidate: Sesiidae Clearwing Moth - 20140827
adamitshelanu
 
   
 
About

Published on Aug 27, 2014

Candidate: Sesiidae Clearwing Moth - 20140827

Insect species:

Synanthedon scitula

Dogwood Borer Moth or Pecan Borer Moth

Date: 27 AUGUST 2014

[vado-g3 avidemux]

 
     

 

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Alfredo Colon
6/22/2018

Location: Woodbury, Minnesota

dogwood borer


     
     
 

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