Dryad’s Saddle

(Polyporus squamosus)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

Dryad’s Saddle

NatureServe

not listed

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common

Season

Spring

Habitat/Hosts

Hardwood and mixed forests. Dead and living hardwoods, especially elm.


Identification

This is a common, easily recognized, wood decaying, bracket fungus. It fruits mostly in the spring but occasionally also in the summer or fall. It is found usually in overlapping clusters of 2 or 3, sometimes singly. It is both saprobic, occurring on logs and stumps of dead hardwood trees, and parasitic, occurring on the lower trunk of living hardwood trees, especially elms.

The fruiting body is a large, stalked bracket. The bracket is circular to fan-shaped or kidney-shaped, 2¼ to 12 in diameter, and up to 1½ thick. The upper surface is light yellowish-brown with flat, brown or dark brown scales. The scales have a feathery appearance, which accounts for the common names Hawk’s Wing and Pheasant’s Back.

The underside is whitish. The pores are small at first, becoming very large, up to in the largest dimension.

The stalk (stipe) is short, thick, tough, and often off-center. It is 1¼ to 4 long and ¾ to 2¼ in diameter. As it ages the base of the stipe becomes velvety black.

The flesh is white.

The spores are whitish to cream-colored.

 
Similar
Species

 


Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 4, 7, 24, 26, 29, 77.


Comments

 


Taxonomy

Division:

Basidiomycota (club fungi)

 

Subdivision:

Agaricomycotina (jelly fungi, yeasts, and mushrooms)

 

Class:

Agaricomycetes (mushroom-forming fungi)

 

No Rank:

Agaricomycetes incertae sedis

 

Order:

Polyporales

 

Family:

Polyporaceae (bracket fungi)

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

Dryad’s Saddle

Hawk’s Wing

Pheasant’s Back


 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

saprobic

Obtaining its nutrients from non-living organic matter, such as decaying plant or animal matter.

 

stipe

A supporting stalk-like structure lacking vascular tissue: in fungi, the stalk supporting the mushroom cap; in ferns, the stalk connecting the blade to the rhizome; in flowering plants, the stalk connecting the flower’s ovary to the receptacle; in orchids; the band connecting the pollina with the viscidium.

       

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Kirk Nelson


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Camera

     

Slideshows

   
  Dryad Saddle
Andree Reno Sanborn
 
  Dryad Saddle  
 
About

Polyporus squamosus

 
     
  Dryad's Saddle (Polyporus squamosus)
Bill Keim
 
  Dryad's Saddle (Polyporus squamosus)  
     
  Polyporus squamosus
Thierry SaintEtienne
 
   
 
About

Published on May 29, 2013

Un champignon trouvé sur une souche dans le jardin.

J'ai créé cette vidéo à l'aide de l'outil de création de diaporamas YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/upload).

 
     

 

slideshow

     

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Other Videos

 
  Dryad Saddle Mushroom
MiWilderness
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on May 15, 2011

Polyporus squamosus is a spring time wild edible mushroom that is found in the same habitat and at the same time of year as morel mushrooms here in Southern Michigan.

 
     
  Super Huge Fungus - Dryad's Saddle (Polyporus squamosus) on a tree
Pondguru
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jul 14, 2011

Awesome example of large tree fungus on a sycamore tree.

Name is Dryad's Saddle (Polyporus squamosus) and it is edible when younger.

Thanks to 'grifola' for that information.

 
     
  Pheasantback Mushroom (Polyporus Squamosus)
karenchakey
 
   
 
About

Published on May 20, 2013

I found mushrooms today, I was pretty sure they were Pheasantback or Dryad's saddle but wasn't 100% sure till I put this video up so I didn't bring them home, my research says you should always pick them small, large ones are rubbery! and they have a faint smell of watermellon.

 
     
  Dryad's saddle (Polyporus squamosus) / Pheasantback - 2013-06-18
W3stlander
 
   
 
About

Published on Jun 28, 2013

Polyporus squamosus is a basidiomycete bracket fungus, with common names including Dryad's saddle and Pheasant's back mushroom

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De zadelzwam (Polyporus squamosus) is een paddenstoel uit de familie Polyporaceae. Gefilmd in natuurgebied de Uithofpolder Den Haag (t.o. Het Wenpad, Poeldijk).

52.03239 4.24181

 
     

 

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Kirk Nelson
5/15/2016

Location: Lebanon Hills Regional Park

Dryad’s Saddle


     
     
 

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