arge moth

(Apantesis arge)

arge moth
Photo by Nancy Falkum
  Hodges #

8199

 
 
Conservation Status
  IUCN Red List

not listed

 
  NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

 
  Minnesota

not listed

 
           
           
           
           
 
Description
 
 

Arge moth is a common, medium-sized, tiger moth. It occurs in North America from southern Quebec to northern Florida, west to South Dakota and New Mexico. It is most common in northeast and south-central United States, less common in Minnesota. Larva feed on the leaves of many low-growing plants and vines, including corn, dock, goosefoot, grape, plantain, prickly pear, smartweed, and sunflower. Adults are found in from April to September in dry open areas, including dry woodlands, dunes, grasslands, meadows, pastures, sand plains, and waste lots. They do not feed.

Adults are robust, hairy, and creamy-white and black, sometimes tinged with pink. They are ¾ to 1 (20 to 26 mm) in length and have a 1½ to 2 (38 to 50 mm) wingspan. The thorax is densely covered with long, creamy white hairs, sometimes partially tinged pinkish. It has three black longitudinal stripes and a dark pink collar. The abdomen is mostly white, tinged pink on top (dorsally), with two rows of black spots on each side. The head is white. The antennae are black. On the male they are feathery, with extensions along both sides of the shaft (bipectinate). The antennae on the female are slender and thread-like. The mouthparts are not functional.

The male forewing length is 1116 (18.3 mm). The forewing is mostly white. The background color is black. The veins and bands are white. The leading edge (costal margin), inner margin, and outer margin all have a broad white band on the border. Most veins are broadly bordered with white. The anal vein (A1+2) is white but is not bordered, and it merges with the band on the inner margin. The postmedial (PM) band is sharply bent, touches the subterminal (ST) band, and meets the costal margin at an oblique angle. The ST band is W-shaped. The fringe is white. The costal cell (C1) is white, being overlayed by the broad costal border. This feature distinguishes arge moth from all other Apantesis moths except Apantesis doris, which does not occur in Minnesota.

The hindwing is white and is shaded with pink. It has just a few small black spots. The larger spots, if any, are divided by white or pink lines.

The female is similar but has a forewing length of 1516 (23.8 mm).

The caterpillar is purple to charcoal black and 1¾ (45 mm) long. There are prominent white stripes in the middorsal and subdorsal areas. These white stripes often have areas tinged with orange. The body is covered with clusters of long hairs (setae). Each cluster rises from a black wart. Each lateral wart has at least one very long seta.

 
     
 

Size

 
 

Total Length: ¾ to 1 (20 to 26 mm)

Wingspan: 1½ to 2 (38 to 50 mm)

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
     
     
 
Habitat
 
 

Dry open areas, including dry woodlands, dunes, grasslands, meadows, pastures, sand plains, and waste lots

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Season

 
 

Two generations per year: April to September

 
     
 

Behavior

 
 

Adults will come to black light. The wings are held over the body like a roof when at rest.

 
     
 

Life Cycle

 
 

 

 
     
 

Larva Hosts

 
 

Many low-growing plants and vines, including corn, dock, goosefoot, grape, plantain, prickly pear, smartweed, and sunflower

 
     
 

Adult Food

 
 

Adults do not feed.

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

21, 24, 27, 29, 30, 71, 75.

 
  12/1/2021      
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

Common

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
 

Order

Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)  
 

Suborder

Glossata  
 

Infraorder

Neolepidoptera  
  Parvorder Heteroneura  
  No Rank Ditrysia  
  No Rank Obtectomera  
 

Superfamily

Noctuoidea (owlet moths and allies)  
 

Family

Erebidae (underwing, tiger, tussock, and allied moths)  
 

Subfamily

Arctiinae (tiger moths and allies)  
 

Tribe

Arctiini (tiger moths)  
  Subtribe Arctiina  
 

Genus

Apantesis  
       
 

In 2011 the family Arctiidae (tiger moths and lichen moths) was transferred to the family Erebidae mostly intact but demoted to a subfamily. The former subfamilies are now tribes, the former tribes are now subtribes.

Until recently, this species was placed in the genus Grammia.

 
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

Apantesis nervosa

Arctia strigosa

Bombyx dione

Grammia arge

Noctua incarnatorubra

Phalaena arge

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

arge moth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Costal margin

The leading edge of the forewing of insects.

 

Postmedial (PM) line

A thin line separating the median area and the postmedial area of the forewing of Lepidoptera.

 

Seta

A stiff, hair-like process on the outer surface of an organism. In Lepidoptera: A usually rigid bristle- or hair-like outgrowth used to sense touch. In mosses: The stalk supporting a spore-bearing capsule and supplying it with nutrients. Plural: setae.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
Visitor Photos
 
           
 

Share your photo of this insect.

 
  This button not working for you?
Simply email us at info@MinnesotaSeasons.com.
Attach one or more photos and, if you like, a caption.
 
 

Nancy Falkum

 
    arge moth      
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
 
 

 

 
           

 

Camera

     
 
Slideshows
 
 
     
     

 

slideshow

       
 
Visitor Videos
 
       
 

Share your video of this insect.

 
  This button not working for you?
Simply email us at info@MinnesotaSeasons.com.
Attach a video, a YouTube link, or a cloud storage link.
 
 

 

 
     
     
       
       
 
Other Videos
 
     
     
     

 

Camcorder

 
 
Visitor Sightings
 
           
 

Report a sighting of this insect.

 
  This button not working for you?
Simply email us at info@MinnesotaSeasons.com.
Be sure to include a location.
 
  Nancy Falkum
4/24/2021

Location: Kellogg Weaver Dunes SNA, Weaver Dunes Unit

arge moth

 
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Sightings
 
 

 

 

 

 

Binoculars


Created: 12/1/2021

Last Updated:

About Us | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | © 2022 MinnesotaSeasons.com. All rights reserved.