reversed haploa

(Haploa reversa)

               
Hodges #

8109

reversed haploa

 

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

SNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common

Flight/Season

One generation per year: Late May to early July

Habitat

Woodlands, wetlands, fields, and gardens

Size

Total Length: to 1 (22 to 28 mm)

Wingspan: 1¾ to 2 (45 to 50 mm)

 
 
Identification

Reversed haploa is a broad-winged, somewhat flimsy-looking tiger moth. It occurs in the United States from Ohio to Minnesota south to North Carolina and Oklahoma, and in Ontario. Adults are found from late May to early July in woodlands, wetlands, fields, and gardens. Larvae (caterpillars) feed on the leaves of many woody plants including apple, ash, and elm.

Adults are to 1 (22 to 28 mm) long and have a wingspan of 1¾ to 2 (45 to 50 mm).

The wings are held over the body like a roof when at rest. The forewing is creamy white with bold, dark brown markings. The inner, outer, and leading (costal) margins are dark except at the wingtip. A long diagonal line extends from the middle of the costal margin to the point where the inner and outer margins meet (anal angle). Before the line, at the wing base, the white area is triangular. Beyond the line the white area is broken into four of five spots.

The head is orangish-yellow. The antennae on both the male and female are slender and thread-like.

The caterpillar is mostly black with a stripe down the middle (middorsal stripe), one on each upper side (subdorsal stripes), and one on each lower side that passes through the breathing pores (spiracular stripe). The middorsal stripe is mostly red to orange with small yellow or white areas at the margins of the abdominal segments. The subdorsal stripes are orange to yellow or white and are often constricted or broken in the middle of each abdominal segment. The spiracular stripes are mostly broken into a row of spots. Each abdominal segment has six large black warts with a cluster of relatively short, barbed. bristle-like structures (setae). The upper (dorsal) setae are black, those on the sides are whitish.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

Leaves of woody plants including apple, ash, and elm.

 
Adult Food

 

 
Life Cycle

Caterpillars overwinter and pupate in the spring.

 
Behavior

The wings are held over the body like a roof when at rest.

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 7, 21, 29, 30, 71, 75.

 
Comments

Taxonomy
In 2010 the family Arctiidae (tiger moths and lichen moths) was transferred to the family Erebidae mostly intact but demoted to a subfamily. The former subfamilies are now tribes, the former tribes now subtribes.

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)

 

Suborder:

Glossata

 

Infraorder:

Neolepidoptera

 

Parvorder:

Heteroneura

 

No Rank:

Ditrysia

 

No Rank:

Obtectomera

 

Superfamily:

Noctuoidea (noctuid moths)

 

Family:

Erebidae

 

Subfamily:

Arctiinae (tiger moths and lichen moths)

 

Tribe:

Arctiini (tiger moths)

 

Subtribe:

Callimorphina

 

Genus:

Haploa

 
Synonyms

Callimorpha reversa

Callimorpha suffusa

 
Common
Names

reversed haploa (caterpillar)

reversed haploa moth (adult)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Anal angle

The angle at the corner formed where the outer and inner margins meet.

 

Costal margin

The leading edge of the forewing of insects.

 

Seta

A stiff, hair-like process on the outer surface of an organism. In Lepidoptera: A usually rigid bristle- or hair-like outgrowth used to sense touch. In mosses:The stalk supporting a spore-bearing capsule and supplying it with nutrients. Plural: setae.

 

Spiracle

A small opening on the surface of an insect through which the insect breathes.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Created: 1/11/2020

Last Updated:

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