saffron-winged meadowhawk

(Sympetrum costiferum)

Conservation Status

 

No Image Available

  IUCN Red List

not listed

     
  NatureServe

N5 - Secure

SNR - Unranked

     
  Minnesota

not listed

     
           
           
 
Description
 
 

Saffron-winged meadowhawk is a medium-sized meadowhawk. It is one of the last dragonflies to be seen in the fall.

On males the thorax is brown on the top, red on the sides, and covered with brown hairs. The abdomen is red. On each side of the abdomen there is a line of low, poorly-formed triangles forming a black stripe. There is usually a thin black line on the upper (dorsal) surface of the 8th and 9th abdominal segments. The face is pale red. The legs are vertically striped yellow and black, becoming red and black in older individuals.

The leading edge of both wings is gold, becoming clear on older individuals. On all individuals the stigma is solid gold or red and the leading veins remain gold or reddish.

On females the abdomen is yellow and the face is light yellow or almost white. On juveniles the thorax is yellow without black markings.

 
     
 

Size

 
 

Total Length: 1¼ to 1½

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
  White-faced meadowhawk (Sympetrum obtrusum) has black legs. On juveniles, the veins near the base of the wing (where it attaches to the thorax) are yellow but the leading veins are black except at the base. The stigmas are black.  
     
 
Habitat
 
 

Ponds, especially when bordered by marshes.

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Season

 
 

Early June to late October

 
     
 

Behavior

 
 

 

 
     
 

Life Cycle

 
 

After mating the female, still with the male still attached, lays eggs by dipping the tip of the abdomen into shallow water. Eggs overwinter and hatch in the spring. The nymphs emerge in at night from early June to late August.

 
     
 

Nymph Food

 
 

Mosquito larvae, other aquatic fly larvae, mayfly larvae, freshwater shrimp, very small fish, and tadpoles.

 
     
 

Adult Food

 
 

Mosquitoes, flies, small moths, mayflies, flying ants, termites, and other soft flying insects.

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

7, 16, 18.

 
  9/8/2018      
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

Common

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
 

Order

Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies)  
 

Suborder

Epiprocta  
  Infraorder Anisoptera (dragonflies)  
 

Superfamily

Cavilabiata  
 

Family

Libellulidae (skimmers)  
 

Genus

Sympetrum  
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

 

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

saffron-winged meadowhawk

 
       

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Stigma

In plants, the portion of the female part of the flower that is receptive to pollen. In Lepidoptera, an area of specialized scent scales on the forewing of some skippers, hairstreaks, and moths. In other insects, a thickened, dark, or opaque cell on the leading edge of the wing.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
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Slideshows
 
Saffron Winged Meadowhawk
DianesDigitals
  Saffron Winged Meadowhawk  
 
About

Copyright DianesDigitals

 
Saffron-winged Meadowhawk
Andree Reno Sanborn
  Saffron-winged Meadowhawk  
 
About

Sympetrum costiferum

 
     

 

slideshow

       
 
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Other Videos
 
  Saffron-winged Meadowhawk (Libellulidae: Sympetrum costiferum) on Leaf
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Aug 20, 2010

Photographed at the Rydell NWR, Minnesota (20 August 2010). Go here to find other images of this species: http://bugguide.net/node/view/27197/bgimage

 
       

 

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