Eastern Towhee

(Pipilo erythrophthalmus)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

LC - Least Concern

 

No Image Available

NatureServe

N5 - Secure

SNRB - Unranked Breeding

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Uncommon migrant and breeder southeat, central, north-central, and northwest; rare to casual elsewhere

Habitat

Woodland edges and shrubby fields

Size

7 to 8½ in length

10½ wingspan


Identification

 

 
Voice

 

 
Similar
Species

 


Food

 

 
Nesting

 

 
Migration

 


Comments

Taxonomy
New World sparrows were traditionally combined with buntings into the family Emberizidae. Recent phylogenetic analysis (Barker et al. 2013) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis (Klicka et al. 2014) found that the Old World buntings should be separated as a sister to New World sparrows. New World sparrows have been separated into a new family, Passerellidae.


Taxonomy

Order:

Passeriformes (perching birds)

 

Family:

Passerellidae (New World sparrows)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

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Slideshows

   
  Eastern Towhee
Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren
 
  Eastern Towhee  
     
  Eastern Towhee
JMC Nature Photos
 
  Eastern Towhee  
     
  Eastern Towhee
jt893x
 
  Eastern Towhee  

 

slideshow

     

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Other Videos

 
  Male Eastern Towhee, Pipilo erythrophthalmus
Bob C
 
   
 
About

Published on Mar 31, 2012

Size & Shape
Towhees are a kind of large sparrow. Look for their thick, triangular, seed-cracking bill as a tip-off they're in the sparrow family. Also notice the chunky body and long, rounded tail.

Color Pattern
Males are striking: bold sooty black above and on the breast, with warm rufous sides and white on the belly. Females have the same pattern, but are rich brown where the males are black.

Behavior
Eastern Towhees spend most of their time on the ground, scratching at leaves using both feet at the same time, in a kind of backwards hop. They spend lots of time concealed beneath thick underbrush. You may see this bird more often when it climbs into shrubs and low trees to sing.

Habitat
Look for Eastern Towhees in brush, tangles, thickets, and along forest edges where there's plenty of leaf litter for the birds to forage in.

Credit, http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eastern_Towhee/id

Found at Blacklick Woods Metro Park, March 29, 2012

 
     
  Eastern Towhee Song - Pennsylvania
Clive Bramham
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Oct 30, 2011

Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus; Rødsidetovi) singing. The unmistakably loud and emphatic "drink your tea" song. Typical bird of woodland edges. Westmoreland County, July. Playlists: Birds of Pennsylania and North America. MP4

 
     
  Rufous-sided Towhee at Rockefeller State Park Preserve
VideoBirder
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Mar 22, 2010

Rufous-sided Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) at Rockerfeller State Park, Sleepy Hollow, New York

 
     
  Eastern Towhee Singing (Nature Sounds) Michigan - June 22, 2011 - Open Window Videos
Connie Myres
 
   
 
About

Published on Mar 9, 2012

This Eastern Towhee came out after a thunderstorm swept through and knocked out the power. To me, it looks like it has an executioner's hood on. Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus).

--- Open Window Videos are videos of a scene that appear and sound as if you are looking out an open window into a landscape. These nature sound videos are meant to played in the background on a screen as if you had an open window. They are best viewed on a flat screen TV on the wall or computer monitor.

--- Visit: ConnieMyres.com

 
     
  Eastern Towhee
The Music of Nature
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jul 19, 2010

The Music of Nature proudly presents "Eastern Towhee," a video portrait that features exquisite footage and great sound. The video includes scenes depicting several individuals; note the considerable variation in song. The "classic" song sounds like "drink your teeeee." The call sounds like "tchweee" or "tow-weee".

© 2010 Lang Elliott
musicofnature.org

 
     

 

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