yellow-collared scape moth

(Cisseps fulvicollis)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not listed

yellow-collared scape moth

 

NatureServe

NNR - Unranked

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Widespread; not common but locally abundant

Flight/Season

Probably two generations; June to September

Habitat

Wet meadows and prairies, old fields

Size

Total Length: to ¾ (16 to 20 mm)

Wingspan: 1 to 17 16 (29 to 37 mm)

          Photo by Luciearl
 
Identification

Yellow-collared scape moth is a small to medium-sized, day flying, wasp-mimic, tiger moth. It occurs across North America from east coast to the west coast and from Texas to the Northwest Territories. It looks superficially similar to the closely related Virginia ctenucha but is smaller and narrower.

The head is black. The antennae are black and feather-like, with branches only on one side of most segments.

The thorax is black or dark brown. There are brightly colored scales on the first section of the thorax (prothorax) forming a broad collar that extends across the upper (dorsal) surface and down the sides. The scales are orange on most individuals, orangish-yellow or yellow on others.

The abdomen is black and often has a metallic blue iridescence. The forewings are dark brown to blackish-brown, long, and narrow. The hindwings are smaller, black around the edges, grayish-white and translucent with black veins in the middle. They are hidden when the moth is perched.

The caterpillar is up to 13 16 (3 cm) long. The thorax and abdomen are yellow with a black stripe down the middle (middorsal), a broad black stripe on each side, and a narrow brownish-orange stripe in the subdorsal area and in the subspiracular area. The head is pale brownish-orange, and shiny. On most caterpillars,there is a dark line across the face or dark markings around the eyes. The body is mostly hidden beneath dense tufts of long, stiff, dirty white hairs (seta). The setae rise from circular warts that are not colored. The warts on the second and third thoracic segment (T2 and T3) and on the ninth abdominal segment (A9) are enlarged and oval. The front and back parts of the body also have longer darker hairs. The abdominal leg-like structures (prolegs) are pale.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Larval Food

Grasses and sedges

 
Adult Food

Nectar of flowers, especially goldenrods

 
Life Cycle

The cocoon is formed mostly from body hairs.

 
Behavior

Adults are active during the day. They are attracted to ultraviolet light. Caterpillars feed close to the ground at night and are rarely seen.

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 7, 24, 27, 29, 30.

 
Comments

What’s in a Name?
The name scape moth refers to the long basal segment of the antennae (scape) on members of this genus. The term “yellow-collared” is a misnomer, since most individuals have an orange collar.

Taxonomy
This species was formerly placed in the Ctenuchini tribe, the Ctenuchinae subfamily, and the Arctiidae family. Based on a large-scale molecular DNA study published in 2011, the entire family was lowered to subfamily family level and placed within the Erebidae family. The former subfamilies became tribes and the former tribes became subtribes.

 
Taxonomy

Order:

Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)

 

Suborder:

Glossata

 

Infraorder:

Neolepidoptera

 

Parvorder:

Heteroneura

 

No Rank:

Ditrysia

 

No Rank:

Obtectomera

 

Superfamily:

Noctuoidea (noctuid moths)

 

Family:

Erebidae

 

Subfamily:

Arctiinae (tiger and lichen moths)

 

Tribe:

Arctiini (tiger moths)

 

Subtribe:

Ctenuchina

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

yellow-collared scape moth

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

Collar

In grasses: The area on the back of a grass leaf at the junction of the sheath and the blade. In moths: the array of scales on the dorsal part of the prothorax.

 

Costa

In plants: The central axis of a pinna, to which pinnules are attached. In Lepidoptera: The leading edge of the forewing.

 

Proleg

A fleshy structure on the abdomen of some insect larvae that functions as a leg, but lacks the five segments of a true insect leg.

 

Prothorax

The first (forward) segment of the thorax on an insect, bearing the first pair of legs but not wings.

 

Seta

A stiff, hair-like process on the outer surface of an organism. In Lepidoptera: A usually rigid bristle- or hair-like outgrowth used to sense touch. In mosses:The stalk supporting a spore-bearing capsule and supplying it with nutrients. Plural: setae.

 

Spiracle

A small opening on the surface of an insect through which the insect breathes.

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Lynn Rubey
       

A Yellow-collared Scape Moth in The Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge as it landed on a leaf.

  yellow-collared scape moth    
       

A Yellow-collared Scape Moth in flight in The Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge.

  yellow-collared scape moth    
       
Luciearl
       
  yellow-collared scape moth    
       
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  Yellow-collared Scape Moth (Cisseps fulvicollis)
Bill Keim
 
  Yellow-collared Scape Moth (Cisseps fulvicollis)  

 

slideshow

       
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Other Videos
 
  Cisseps fulvicollis = YELLOW-COLLARED SCAPE MOTH
Rob Curtis
 
   
 
About

Published on Oct 15, 2016

Cisseps fulvicollis = YELLOW-COLLARED SCAPE MOTH

   
       
  Yellow-collared scape moth drinking nectar in flowers
GoTrails
 
   
 
About

Published on Jul 3, 2019

Yellow-collared scape moth drinking nectar and pollen in flowers | Wildlife, Animal Behavior, Nature, Insects | Lepidoptera, Heterocera, heteróceros, Nachtfalter, hétérocères, papillons de nuit, falene | Cisseps fulvicollis, Cisseps à col orangé | #moths, #insects, #GoTrails

   
       

 

Camcorder

         
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Lynn Rubey
8/13/2019

Location: Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge

A Yellow-collared Scape Moth in The Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge as it landed on a leaf.

yellow-collared scape moth


Luciearl
6/27/2018

Location: Fritz Loven Park, Lake Shore, MN

yellow-collared scape moth


     
     
 
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Created: 7/9/2019

Last Updated:

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