velvet-leaf

(Abutilon theophrasti)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

velvet-leaf

NatureServe

NNA - Not applicable

SNA - Not applicable

Minnesota

not listed

Wetland
Indicator
Status

Great Plains

UPL - Obligate upland

Midwest

FACU - Facultative upland

Northcentral & Northeast

FACU - Facultative upland

Weed Status

County Noxious Weed in Chippewa, Cottonwood, Murray, Steele, and Waseca Counties

Nativity

Native to northern Africa, western Asia, Pakistan, and eastern Europe. Introduced and naturalized in the United States.

Occurrence

 

Habitat

Dry. Fields, disturbed sites. Full sun.

Flowering

July to October

     
Flower Color

Yellow to orangish-yellow

     
Height

1 to 4, occasionally taller

     

Identification

This is a 1 to 4 tall, occasionally taller, stout, erect, annual forb that rises from a slender taproot.

The stem is much branched above the middle and is covered with star-shaped hairs that have just a few branches from the base (stellate).

The leaves are alternate, large, 4 to 6 long, and heart-shaped with a notch at the base. They are gradually taper to a sharp point with concave sides along the tip. They are covered on both sides with stellate hairs, making them velvety to the touch. The margins have minute, blunt teeth. They are borne on 1 to 5 long leaf stalks that are also covered with stellate hairs.

The inflorescence consists of solitary flowers born on ¾ to 1¼ long stalks arising from the upper angle of the junction between the leaf and the stem (axils). The flower stalks are covered with stellate hairs.

The flowers are ½ to 1 wide with 5 yellow to orangish-yellow petals.

The fruit is ¾ to 1¼ wide and densely hairy. They have 10 to 15 awned segments, each containing a gray-grown, kidney-shaped seed. The seeds remain viable for up to 50 years.

 
Similar
Species

No similar species


Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 22, 28.


Comments

 


Taxonomy

Family:

Malvaceae (mallow)

 

Subfamily:

Malvoideae

 

Tribe:

Malveae

 
Synonyms

Abutilon abutilon

Abutilon avicennae

Abutilon avicennae f. nigrum

Abutilon californicum

Abutilon pubescens

Abutilon theophrasti var. chinense

Abutilon theophrasti var. nigrum

Abutilon tiliifolium

Malva abutilon

Sida abutilon

Sida tiliifolia

 
Common
Names

abutilon-hemp

butterprint

butter-print

butter-weed

buttonweed

China jute

China-jute

cotton-weed

Indian hemp

 

Indian mallow

piemacker

tientsin-jute

velvet leaf

velvetleaf

velvetleaf Indian mallow

velvetweed

velvet-leaf

velvet-weed


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

awn

A stiff, bristle-like appendage at the tip of the glume, lemma, or palea of grass florets.

 

axil

The upper angle where the leaf stalk meets the stem.

 

stellate

Star-shaped. Stellate hairs have several or many branches from the base.

       

Visitor Photos

   
Share your photo of this plant.

       
       
       
       

MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos

   

Plant

  velvet-leaf    
       

Flower

  velvet-leaf   velvet-leaf
       

Infructescence

  velvet-leaf   velvet-leaf
       
  velvet-leaf    
       

Fruit

  velvet-leaf   velvet-leaf
       
  velvet-leaf    
       

Winter

  velvet-leaf   velvet-leaf
       
       

 

Camera

     

Slideshows

   
     
     
     

 

slideshow

     

Visitor Videos

   
Share your video of this plant.

     
     

Other Videos

 
  Weed of the Week #794 - Velvetleaf (Air Date 6/23/13)
AgPhD's channel
 
   
 
About

Published on Jun 29, 2013

It's our Weed of the Week, Velvetleaf.

 
     
  Identification and Control of Velvetleaf
crop4240
 
   
 
About

Published on Oct 29, 2012

6 University of Guelph students got together for a project to assist you in identifying and controlling the weed velvetleaf, in whatever line of work you may be in. Thanks to Matt Underwood, Josh burrows, Natalie Renkema, Matt Smyth, Stuart Vermeulen, and Christine Littlejohn.

 
     
  The Urban-Abo Bushcraft: Cordage: (Velvet-Leaf)
theurbanabo
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jul 22, 2010

Velvet-leaf (Abutilon Theophrasti) has been grown in China since around 2000 BCE for its strong, jute-like fiber to make cordage, thread, nets, and woven bags.

This is a very useful plant for making medium to medium-strong cordage. The fibers can be obtained along the tall long stalks. The skin, which contain the fibers, come off in long strips when the plant is green. The thin green top skin can be scraped off to reveal a network of light-yellow fibers.

For more information, please visit: www.TheUrbanAbo.com

 
     
  Velvet leaf
IA Woodsman
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Oct 26, 2009

 
     
  Velvet Leaf
Maple Creek Farm
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Apr 26, 2011

Velvet Leaf

Media Arts

 
     

 

Camcorder

Last Updated:

About Us | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | © 2017 MinnesotaSeasons.com. All rights reserved.