summer azure

(Celastrina neglecta)

Conservation Status
summer azure
Photo by Kali Kocmoud
  IUCN Red List

not listed

     
  NatureServe

N5 - Secure

S5 - Secure

     
  Minnesota

not listed

     
           
           
           
           
           
           
 
Description
 
 

Summer azure is a small to medium-sized butterfly with a wingspan of 15 16 to 1. It occurs in North America east of the Great Plains. It is very common in Minnesota.

On the male, the upperside of the forewing is powder blue with a narrow black border just near the wingtip. The hindwing is lighter blue with no black markings. On the female, there is a broad black border on the forewing. On both sexes, the underside of both wings is pale grayish-blue or white with several black spots, more or less forming an inner and outer band across both wings, and a zigzag line in the submarginal area. The hindwing has no orange on the underside and it has no tail. The fringe on the forewing is white with black spots, while on the hindwing it is entirely white.

The eyes are black.

The antennae are black-and-white striped with a white-tipped club.

 
     
 

Size

 
 

Wingspan: 15 16 to 1 (24 to 29 mm)

 
     
 

Similar Species

 
  Spring azure and northern spring azure fly from late April to late June. Any azure seen in Minnesota after July 1 is almost certainly a summer azure.  
     
 
Habitat
 
 

Forest edges, woodland trails, open woodlands, powerline rights-of-way, old fields, bogs, and swamps.

 
     
 
Biology
 
 

Season

 
 

One generation per year: Early July to early September

 
     
 

Behavior

 
 

 

 
     
 

Life Cycle

 
 

Pupa (chrysalids) overwinter and emerge as adults in late spring or summer.

 
     
 

Larva Hosts

 
 

Unlike its close relatives, summer azure caterpillars feed on a wide variety of trees and shrubs, including dogwood, meadowsweet, and New Jersey tea.

 
     
 

Adult Food

 
 

Flower nectar

 
     
 
Distribution
 
 

Distribution Map

 

Sources

7, 21, 29, 30, 71.

 
  4/25/2019      
         
 

Occurrence

 
 

Common

 
         
 
Taxonomy
 
 

Order

Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)  
 

Suborder

Glossata  
 

Infraorder

Neolepidoptera  
  Parvorder Heteroneura  
  No Rank Ditrysia  
  No Rank Obtectomera  
 

Superfamily

Papilionoidea (butterflies [excluding skippers])  
 

Family

Lycaenidae (gossamer-wings)  
 

Subfamily

Polyommatinae (blues)  
 

Tribe

Polyommatini  
 

Genus

Celastrina  
       
 

Unitl recently, most North American azures were considered subspecies of Celastrina ladon. Research in the 1990s identified at least six distinct species in what is now recognized as the Celastrina ladon complex. Three of these new species occur in Minnesota: northern spring azure (Celastrina lucia), spring azure (Celastrina ladon), and summer azure (Celastrina neglecta).

 
       
 

Synonyms

 
 

Celastrina ladon argentata

Celastrina ladon neglecta

 
       
 

Common Names

 
 

summer azure

 
       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
Visitor Photos
 
           
 

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Kali Kocmoud

 
    summer azure   summer azure  
           
    summer azure      
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos
 
    summer azure      
           

 

Camera

     
 
Slideshows
 
Summer Azure (Celestrina neglecta)
Andree Reno Sanborn
  Summer Azure (Celestrina neglecta)  
     

 

slideshow

       
 
Visitor Videos
 
       
 

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Other Videos
 
  Summer Azure (Lycaenidae: Celastrina neglecta) on Leaf
Carl Barrentine
 
   
 
About

Published on Aug 13, 2010

Photographed at Grand Forks, North Dakota (13 August 2010).

 
  Summer Azure Butterfly on Slender Mountain Mint
Tom Terrific
 
   
 
About

Published on Apr 13, 2014

Slender Mountain Mint is a great nectar plant for many butterflies. It is a bit invasive so you will have to take some time to control it.

 
       

 

Camcorder

 
 
Visitor Sightings
 
           
 

Report a sighting of this insect.

 
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  Kali Kocmoud
7/10/2021

Location: New Richmond, WI

summer azure  
           
 
MinnesotaSeasons.com Sightings
 
   

 

 

Binoculars


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