apical chlorosis of Canada thistle (Pst)

(Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

apical chlorosis of Canada thistle (Pst)

NatureServe

not listed

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common

Season

Symptoms most noticeable from June to September

Habitat/Hosts

Plants in the Aster (Asteraceae) family, including
Canada thistle, common dandelion, common sunflower, common ragweed, giant ragweed, and Jerusalem artichoke

 
Identification

Outside of a laboratory, a bacterium is recognized only by the symptoms it produces in its host. Apical chlorosis of Canada thistle (Pst) (Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis) is a bacterium that infects some plants in the aster (Asteraceae) family. It produces the substance tagetitoxin, which blocks the production of chloroplasts, preventing photosynthesis. This results in whitened plant growth (chlorosis) on only the upper portion of the plant, stunted growth, fewer shoots, and inhibition of flowering.

 
Similar
Species

 

 
Distribution Distribution Map  

Sources: 7, 26, 30.

 
Comments

Biological Control Agent
Researchers at the University of Minnesota conducted a study in 2002 to assess the viability of using Pst as a biological control agent for Canada thistle.

Overview
Visitors to Minnesota’s natural places will occasionally come across a stand of Canada thistle with a few plants that are whitened at the top, appearing bleached. The discoloration is caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tagetis. It has been called “White‐colour Disease of Canadian Thistle,” “apical chlorosis of Canada thistle,” and “Bacterial Speck”, but it has no widely-accepted common name. It is often referred to in scientific literature as Pst.

Outside of a laboratory, a bacterium is recognized only by the symptoms it produces in its host. Pst produces the substance tagetitoxin, which blocks the production of chloroplasts, preventing photosynthesis. This results in whitened plant growth (chlorosis) on only the upper portion of the plant, stunted growth, fewer shoots, and inhibition of flowering. Pst infects plants in the Aster family, including Canada thistle, common dandelion, common sunflower, common ragweed, giant ragweed, Jerusalem artichoke, and some other plants not found in Minnesota.

Researchers at the University of Minnesota conducted a study in 2002 to assess the viability of using Pst as a biological control agent for Canada thistle.

 
Taxonomy

Phylum:

Proteobacteria

 

Class:

Gammaproteobacteria

 

Order:

Pseudomonadales

 

Family:

Pseudomonadaceae

 
Synonyms

 

 
Common
Names

apical chlorosis of Canada thistle

Bacterial Speck

Pst

White‐colour Disease of Canadian Thistle

 

 

 

 

 

 

       
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Pst on Canada thistle

  apical chlorosis of Canada thistle (Pst)   apical chlorosis of Canada thistle (Pst)
       
  apical chlorosis of Canada thistle (Pst)    
       
       

 

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