garlic mustard

(Alliaria petiolata)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

garlic mustard

NatureServe

NNA - Not applicable

SNA - Not applicable

Minnesota

not listed

Wetland
Indicator
Status

Great Plains

FACU - Facultative upland

Midwest

FAC - Facultative

Northcentral & Northeast

FACU - Facultative upland

Weed Status

RN – Restricted noxious weed

Invasive

Nativity

Native to southern and eastern Europe, Northern Africa, Asia, and the Indian subcontinent. Introduced into the North America as a potherb. Escaped cultivation and naturalized.

Occurrence

Common

 
Habitat

Moist to moderate moisture. Woodlands, wood edges, trail edges, roadsides. Partial or full shade.

 
Flowering

April to June

     
Flower Color

White

     
Height

12 to 40

     

Identification

This is an erect, 12 to 40 tall, biennial, herbaceous plant rising from a slender, white taproot that forms a shallow “S” just below the base of the stem. In the first year it produces a rosette of 3 or 4 leaves. The plants stay green over the first winter. In the second year it also produces one or two tall flowering stems. It forms dense stands that block virtually all sunlight from reaching the ground. Second-year plants die by late June, leaving only the erect stalks with dry, pale brown seedpods. All parts of the plant smell like garlic.

The stems are usually unbranched, sometimes slightly branched. They are hairless of have a few simple hairs.

The first year leaves are kidney-shaped, about 2 wide and 2 long. They are green, hairless, coarsely toothed, and deeply veined. They are on leaf stalks that are about as long as the leaf.

The second year leaves are similar to those of the first year. The basal leaves are kidney-shaped. The stem leaves are alternate, light green or yellowish green, with pointed tips, heart-shaped near the bottom of the stem, becoming smaller, more triangular, and nearly stemless as they ascend the stem.

The inflorescence is a short, button-like cluster at the end of each stem.

The flowers are small, wide, with 4 white petals The petals have rounded tips and narrow to the base.

The fruits are slender, 4-angled, 1 to 2½ long pods containing single rows of seeds. The pods spread widely, from horizontal to erect. they becomes shiny black when mature.

 
Similar
Species

The coarsely toothed triangular stem leaves and kidney-shaped basal leaves that smell of garlic when crushed make this plant easy to identify.

Mints have similar leaves but their leaves are always opposite and their stems are conspicuously 4-angled.

Bitter cresses (Cardamine spp.) are similar but their leaves are never coarsely toothed, and the flowers are on longer flower stalks.


Distribution Distribution Map   Sources: 2, 3, 4, 7, 22, 28.

Comments

Seed Viability
Seeds are viable in the soil for 2 to 5 years.

Allelopathic
This plant produces allelopathic compounds that inhibit seed germination of other species.


Taxonomy

Family:

Brassicaceae (mustard)

 

Tribe:

Thlaspideae

 
Synonyms

Alliaria alliacea

Alliaria alliaria

Alliaria officinalis

Arabis petiolata

Crucifera alliaria

Erysimum alliaria

Hesperis alliaria

Sisymbrium alliaceum

Sisymbrium alliaria

 
Common
Names

garlic mustard

garlic-mustard


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

allelopathy

The release of a chemical toxin by one plant to inhibit the growth or germination of nearby competing plants.

       

Visitor Photos

   
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MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos

   

Habitat

  garlic mustard    
       

Plant

  garlic mustard   garlic mustard
       
  garlic mustard    
       

Inflorescence

  garlic mustard   garlic mustard
       

Flowers

  garlic mustard   garlic mustard
       

Leaves

  garlic mustard   garlic mustard
       

Infructescence

  garlic mustard   garlic mustard
       
       

 

Camera

     

Slideshows

   
  Garlic Mustard
Wez Smith
 
  Garlic Mustard  
 
About

Garlic Mustard (Alliara petiolata).

 
     
  Garlic Mustard - Alliaria petiolata
Virens (Latin for greening)
 
  Garlic Mustard - Alliaria petiolata  
 
About

An invasive species which which poses an ecological threat to natural areas of New York State. A single plant can produce thousands of seeds, which scatter as much as several meters from the parent plant.

Source:
Plant Conservation Alliance's Alien Plant Working Group
www.nps.gov/plants/ALIEN/fact/alpe1.htm

 
     
  Alliaria petiolata
Susanne Wiik
 
  Alliaria petiolata  
 
About

Løkurt, Garlic mustard, Jack-by-the-hedge

 
     
  Garlic Mustard (Allaria petiolata)
Bill Keim
 
  Garlic Mustard (Allaria petiolata)  
     
  Alliaria petiolata GARLIC MUSTARD
Frank Mayfield
 
  Alliaria petiolata GARLIC MUSTARD  

 

slideshow

     

Visitor Videos

   
Share your video of this plant.

     
     

Other Videos

 
  Garlic Mustard, identification of the Wisconsin Invasive Species Alliaria petiolata
uwcoopextension
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jan 31, 2011

This is part of a series of videos providing key characteristics for the identification of invasive plants listed in Wisconsin's invasive species administrative rule NR 40. These videos are produced by Dr. Mark Renz of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. For more information on invasive plants and invasive plant management in Wisconsin visit http://ipcm.wisc.edu/Publications/WeedSciencepublications/tabid/116/Default.aspx

 
     
  Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) - 2012-04-29
W3stlander
 
   
 
About

Published on May 2, 2012

Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is a biennial flowering plant in the Mustard family, Brassicaceae.

--------------------
Look-zonder-look (Alliaria petiolata, synoniem: Alliaria officinalis) is een algemeen voorkomende plant die behoort tot de kruisbloemenfamilie (Brassicaceae).

 
     
  The Invaders: Garlic Mustard
UMDHGIC
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Oct 24, 2009

Professional Horticulturist and Master Gardener Ellen Nibali identifies Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) and explains how to remove this invasive plant from your garden.

Click here to read our publication on invasive species for even more information: http://www.hgic.umd.edu/_media/documents/publications/hg88.pdf

This video is brought to you by the Home and Garden Information Center, part of University of Maryland Extension. Learn about our Grow It Eat It campaign, which provides resources and encourages people to start their own food gardens. http://www.growit.umd.edu/

Check out our facebook page for more gardening advice: http://www.facebook.com/UMDHGIC#!/GIEIMaryland

Intro Credit: "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956); Allied Artists. Music and shot of woman screaming used here in accordance with Fair Use.

Shot and Edited by: Alix Watson and Emily Heimsoth

 
     
  Garlic mustard: A Minnesota woodland owner's story
MyMinnesotaWoods
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jun 25, 2010

John Peterson shares his story of identifying, monitoring, and controlling invasive garlic mustard on his Minnesota woodland property.

 
     
  Your DNREC - Invasion of the Garlic Mustard
Delaware DNREC
 
   
 
About

Published on May 11, 2012

Delaware's being invaded... you can help!

 
     

 

Camcorder

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