absinth wormwood

(Artemisia absinthium)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

not yet assessed

absinth wormwood

NatureServe

NNA - Not applicable

SNA - Not applicable

Minnesota

not listed

Nativity

Native

Occurrence

Common

Habitat

Streambanks, old fields, pastures, railroads, disturbed sites. Full sun to partial shade.

Flowering

July to September

Flower Color

Pale yellow

Height

16 to 40


Identification

This is a 16 to 40 tall, erect, long-lived, perennial forb that rises on 20 or more stems from a stout, woody taproot. Like most Artemisia species, the leaves and stem are strongly aromatic when bruised.

The stems are erect or ascending, usually branched, and sometimes woody near the base. When young they are densely covered with short, silky hairs, giving them a grayish-green appearance. Older stems sometimes become nearly hairless.

Basal leaves are deciduous, up to 8 long, and on long leaf stalks. They do not have stipule-like lobes or teeth at the base. They are deeply cut into 3 or 5 primary lobes (pinnatifid). The primary lobes are again divided into secondary lobes (bipinnatifid), which may be once more lobed (3 times pinnatifid). The ultimate lobes are inversely egg-shaped, 1 16 to wide, and are rounded at the tip. When young, the upper and lower surfaces are densely covered with short, silky hairs, giving them a grayish-green appearance. The upper surface of mature leaves is sometimes nearly hairless. The margins are untoothed.

Lower stem leaves are similar, alternate, 2 to 4 long, and on shorter leaf stalks, becoming even smaller, less divided, and on shorter stalks as they ascend the stem. The uppermost leaves may be undivided and stalkless.

The inflorescence is an open, leafy, elongated, branched cluster (panicle) of at the end of the stems and branches. The panicles are 4 to 8 long or longer, 4 to 5 wide or wider, and have numerous flower heads.

The flower heads small and inconspicuous and droop downward. The whorl of bracts at the base of the flower head (involucre) is broadly egg-shaped, 1 16 to long, and to 3 16 wide. The bracts of the involucre are densely covered with silky hairs and have broad, thin, papery, transparent margins and tip. There are no ray florets. The disk has female (pistillate) florets as well as florets that have both male and female parts (perfect). On the margin of the disk are 9 to 20 pale yellow, pistillate florets. In the center are 30 to 50 pale yellow, perfect florets.

The fruit is a tiny achene.

 
Similar
Species

Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) has leaves with a green, hairless upper surface and ultimate lobes that are sharply pointed. The flower heads are smaller


Distribution Distribution Map   Sources: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 22, 28.

Comments

 


Taxonomy

Family:

Asteraceae (aster)

 

Subfamily:

Asteroideae

 

Supertribe:

Asterodae

 

Tribe:

Anthemideae (camomile)

 

Subtribe:

Artemisiinae

 
Synonyms

Artemisia absinthium var. absinthium

Artemisia absinthium var. insipida

 
Common
Names

absinth

absinth sagewort

absinth sage-wort

absinth wormwood

absinthe

absinthe wormwood

absinthium

common sagewort

 

common sage-wort

common wormwood

grand wormwood

mugwort

sage-wort

wormwood sage

wormwood


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glossary

achene

A dry, one-chambered, single-seeded fruit, formed from a single carpel, with the seed attached to the membranous outer layer (wall) only by the seed stalk; the wall, formed entirely from the wall of the superior ovary, does not split open at maturity, but relies on decay or predation to release the contents.

 

bipinnatifid

Twice pinnatifid. Cut deeply into lobes with each lobe also cut into deep lobes.

 

involucre

A whorl of bracts beneath or surrounding a flower or flower cluster.

 

panicle

A pyramidal inflorescence with a main stem and branches. Flowers on the lower, longer branches mature earlier than those on the shorter, upper ones.

 

perfect

Referring to a flower that has both male and female reproductive organs.

 

pinnatifid

Deeply cut, more than half way to the midrib but not to the midrib, into lobes that are spaced out along the midrib; the lobes do not form separate leaflets.

 

pistillate

Referring to a flower that has a female reproductive organ (pistil) but does not have male reproductive organs (stamens).

 

stipule

A small, leaf-like, scale-like, glandular, or rarely spiny appendage found at the base of a leaf stalk, usually occurring in pairs and usually dropping soon.

       

Visitor Photos

   
Share your photo of this plant.

       
       
       
       

MinnesotaSeasons.com Photos

   

Plant

  absinth wormwood   absinth wormwood
       
  absinth wormwood    
       

Inflorescence

  absinth wormwood   absinth wormwood
       

Basal Leaves

  absinth wormwood   absinth wormwood
       
  absinth wormwood   absinth wormwood
       

Stem Leaves

  absinth wormwood   absinth wormwood
       
  absinth wormwood    
       
       

 

Camera

     

Slideshows

   
  Artemisia absinthium
Susanne Wiik
 
  Artemisia absinthium  
 
About

Malurt, Wormwood

 
     
  Artemisia absinthium
Matt Lavin
 
  Artemisia absinthium  
 
About

Introduced taprooted perennial herb 40-80 cm tall (actually to 1 m or more), common along roadsides, fields, and other moderately disturbed settings usually on the wetter end of the moisture gradient. The pendulous heads with hairy receptacles are very similar to those of Artemisia frigida.

 
     
  Artemisia absinthium
Raiven40
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on May 19, 2011

· Plants of future (http://www.pfaf.org)

· GRIN - Taxonomic information (http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxfam.pl?language=es)

 
     

 

slideshow

     

Visitor Videos

   
Share your video of this plant.

     
     

Other Videos

 
  Artemisia absinthium (Absinthe)
TeachEthnobotany
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Nov 29, 2011

Michael Clanahan gives a presentation on the medicinal properties of Artemisia absinthium, commonly known as wormwood and the source of absinthe. In this talk, he discusses the botanical and chemical characteristics of the plant, as well as its known biological activities. This medicinal plant monograph presentation was recorded on November 28th, 2011 as part of Dr. Cassandra L. Quave's undergraduate course entitled "Botanical Medicine and Health" offered at Emory University.

DISCLAIMER: Content provided in this video and the YouTube TeachEthnobotany site is for educational purposes only and should not be construed to be medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not a substitute for professional medical or healthcare advice, diagnosis or treatment, and may not be used for such purposes. The information about herbal medicines and drugs in this video and the TeachEthnobotany site is general in nature. It does not cover all possible uses, actions, precautions, side effects, or interactions of the medicines mentioned, nor is the information intended as medical advice for individual problems or for making an evaluation as to the risks and benefits of taking a particular drug or botanical/herbal medicine. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical question or condition.

 
     
  Wormwood herb: Artemisia absinthium
HerbMentor
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jan 25, 2009

http://FreeHerbCourse.com Wormwood herb, Artemisia absinthium and wormwood uses. how to harvest wormwood, how to grow wormwood. Learn about wormwood in this informative video.

 
     
  'Poisonous Plants 1-2-1' Artemisia absinthium, wormwood
John Robertson
 
   
 
About

Published on Dec 31, 2013

The story of wormwood, used to flavour absinthe, in 121 seconds. For more information on the plant please visit http://www.thepoisongarden.co.uk/atoz/artemisia_absinthium.htm

Or, for a detailed look at absinthe see http://www.thepoisongarden.co.uk/atoz/absinthe.htm

 
     
  Weed of the Week #670-Absinth Wormwood (Air Date 2/6/11)
AgPhD
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2011

No green fairies here. It's our Weed of the Week, Absinth Wormwood.

 
     

 

Camcorder

Last Updated:

About Us | Privacy Policy | Contact Us | © 2017 MinnesotaSeasons.com. All rights reserved.