Killdeer

(Charadrius vociferus)

               
Conservation Status

IUCN Red List

LC - Least Concern

 

No Image Available

NatureServe

N5B, N5N - Secure Breeding and Nonbreeding

SNRB - Unranked Breeding

Minnesota

not listed

Occurrence

Common migrant and breeder

Habitat

Open ground, fields, lake shores, beaches, mudflats

Size

9 to 11 in length

24 wingspan


Identification

 

 
Voice

 

 
Similar
Species

 


Food

 

 
Nesting

 

 
Migration

Late February to Late April and mid-August to November


Comments

 


Taxonomy

Order:

Charadriiformes (shorebirds and relatives)

 

Family:

Charadriidae (plovers and lapwings)

 
Subordinate Taxa

Killdeer (Charadrius vociferous ternominatus)

Killdeer (Charadrius vociferous peruvianus)

North American Killdeer (Charadrius vociferous vociferous)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

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  Killdeer
Andy Reago & Chrissy McClarren
 
  Killdeer  
     
  Killeer
JMC Nature Photos
 
  Killeer  
     
  Killdeer
Craig A. Mullenbach
 
  Killdeer  

 

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Other Videos

 
  Killdeer bird fakes being injured
TheSkeezicks
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jan 8, 2010

This is a short video clip of a Killdeer bird leading me away from its nest by running away from me and pretending to be injured.I had always heard about these birds doing this,but had never seen it until the day I was hiking down the shore at Canyon Ferry Lake in Montana.

 
     
  Baby Killdeer
historicjames1609
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on Jul 19, 2011

Less than a day old, these Killdeer babies are off and running. Amazingly, in their first day of life they look nearly identical to their parents, only on a smaller scale. This bird species nests on the ground, and this particular nest was only one foot away from the path leading to the Voorhees Archaearium (Archaeological Museum). Orange cones set up by one of the archaeologists steered visitors away from the nesting pair in the weeks prior to the eggs hatching. Thousands of visitors walked past this nest and the Killdeer never gave up on the eggs. This video captures one of the adults faking a broken wing in order to lure potential predators (in this case the camera man) away from the nest and vulnerable hatchlings. Every year in the late spring or early summer, at Historic Jamestowne, nesting pairs of Killdeer can be observed in the area around the James Fort site and the Archaearium Museum.

 
     
  A pair of Killdeer Birds
Kansas A
 
   
 
About

Uploaded on May 23, 2007

Two killdeer birds protecting their nest near my garden. At the end of the video a picture of two babies.

 
     
  Killdeer
Alan Heath
 
   
 
About

Published on Mar 9, 2012

SEE MY TRAVEL PAGE ON FACEBOOK :
https://www.facebook.com/MotorhomesOnLine

The Killdeer is a plover. Its range is across the Western Hemisphere. In the summer, Killdeer live as far north as the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, the Yukon, Quebec, as well as the southern parts of the U.S. state of Alaska. Killdeer hold a year-round presence across the southern half of the United States and parts of Peru. The Killdeer winters throughout Central America. Although Killdeer are considered shorebirds, they often live far from water. They live in grassland habitats such as fields, meadows, and pastures. The nest itself is merely a shallow depression or bowl in the ground, fringed by some stones and blades of grass. The nest is well camouflaged, as the spots of the eggs disguise them as stones, and the simple structure of the nest resembles its surroundings. Like many other waders, Killdeer hatchlings are precocial birds and are able to see and forage soon after hatching

They are migratory in northern areas and winter as far south as northern South America. They are rare vagrants to western Europe, usually late in the year.

These birds forage for food in fields, mudflats, and shores, usually by sight. They mainly eat insects.

Their name comes from their frequently heard call. These birds will frequently use a distraction display ("broken-wing act") to distract predators from their nests. This involves the bird walking away from its nesting area holding its wing in a position that simulates an injury and then flapping around on the ground emitting a distress call. The predators then think they have easy prey and are attracted to this seemingly injured bird and away from the nest. If the parent sees that a potential predator is not following them, they will move closer and get louder until they get the attention of the predator. This is repeated until the predator is far from the nest, and the killdeer suddenly "heals" and flies away.

Their ability to exploit a wide range of agricultural and semi-urban habitat has helped keep them common and widespread in their range.

My channel on you tube : http://www.youtube.com/alanheath is one of the most prolific from Poland. I have produced over 2,100 original films.

My big interest in life is travel and history but I have also placed films on other subjects.

Please feel free to ask questions in the public area or to comment on things you disagree with. Sometimes there are mistakes because I speak without preparation. If I see the mistakes myself, I make this clear in the text. Please also leave a star rating!

I am very fortunate that I can spend a large part of my life travelling, thanks to the business I chose to run which allows me to do this. There are a number of films here on the packaging industry. This is because I am the publisher of Central and Eastern European Packaging -- http://www.ceepackaging.com - the international platform for the packaging industry in this region focusing on the latest innovations, trends, design, branding, legislation and environmental issues with in-depth profiles of major industry achievers.

Most people may think packaging pretty boring but it possibly effects your life more than you really imagine!

Central and Eastern European Packaging examines the packaging industry throughout this region, but in particular in the largest regional economies which are Russia, Germany, Poland, Czech Republic, Ukraine and Austria. That is not to say that the other countries are forgotten, they are not, but obviously there is less going on. However the fact that there are so many travel related films here is not from holidays but from business trips attending trade fairs around the region. Every packaging trade fair is a new excuse to make another film!

 
     
  KILLDEER BIRD
Mark Allen Channel
 
   
 
About

Published on Jan 21, 2014

Seen here in high definition [HD] video, a killdeer bird in the city park, northern Arizona. Time is about 5:15 pm, just before sunset, late January. Have you seen a killdeer bird? Leave a comment.

Peace,
Mark Allen Channel (4GUESTS.COM)

 
     

 

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